Chatroulette old version at sfgh yesterday afternoon Chatroulette old version at sfgh yesterday afternoon Register Login Contact Us

Nsa fun close to jhopkins


Nsa fun close to jhopkins

Online: Now

About

I live alone bit of a shy guy at first,very lonely,want someone in my life,never married,no ,no drama,slim build,40's,white,non smoker,no ,like to laugh,like Married male needs some nsa for someone any race,30s-50s,for friendship,leading to ltr hopefully,be hwp,no please,life is too short Nsa fun close to jhopkins that stuff,if your looking for a nice guy,i am here,not the bad boytype,just a caring,honest,lonely guy here,i really hope someone is out there, for ,thanks Adult ladies ready sex lady Long n thick cock for female Only seeking for fun with a local girl 18-44 good seeking would like to meet 1 on 1. 30 vers top like to give and rec oral. If you want to chat a little first feel free Nsa fun close to jhopkins me. Discretion is of most importance.

Chiarra
Age:54
Relationship Status:Newlyweds
Seeking:I Want Nsa
City:DeKalb
Hair:Silver
Relation Type:Bitch Want Men Seeking Sex

Nsa fun close to jhopkins

Sweet Bb Black W Looking For Racine Wisconsin

I like adventure and will try just about anything once. Home depot on Tuder m4w I'll you D so not to give your name away. Wanting to fall in like I am 37 dwm seeking for a a swf around my age.

White chick needing a good lick from a black man w4m Must be clean and professional. Looking for a random hook up m4w looking for a random hookup with a nice chick. Hot young man seeks curvy fuckbuddy m4w I'm waiting for a curvy woman (great tits and boobs) to satisfy sexually. I am seeking for serious opportunities only. Adult wants nsa Wardsboro Anyone wanna go running.

A professor in the computer science department at Johns Hopkins, a leading American university, had written a post on his blog, hosted on the university's servers, focused on his area of expertise, which is cryptography. The post was highly critical of the government, specifically the National Security Agency, whose reckless behavior in attacking online security astonished him.

Not only does the worst possible hypothetical I discussed appear to be true, but it's true on a scale I couldn't even imagine. The post was widely circulated online because it is about the sense of betrayal within a community of technical people who had often collaborated with the government. I linked to it myself. On Monday, he gets a note from the acting dean of the engineering school asking him to take the post down and stop using the NSA logo as clip art in his posts.

The email also informs him that if he resists he will need a lawyer. The professor runs two versions of the same site: He tells the dean that he will take down the site mirrored on the university's system but not the one on blogger.

He also removes the NSA logo from the post. Then, he takes to Twitter. I received a request from my Dean this morning asking me to remove all copies of my NSA blog post from University servers. He says he thought Johns Hopkins University, his employer, had come down "on the wrong side of common sense and academic freedom", particularly since the only classified material he had linked to was from news reports in the Guardian, the New York Times and ProPublica.

Now, Johns Hopkins is worried about how it looks in the media. The university bureaucracy scrambles the jets and comes up with a statement:. The university received information this morning that Matthew Green's blog contained a link or links to classified material and also used the NSA logo. For that reason, we asked professor Green to remove the Johns Hopkins-hosted mirror site for his blog Upon further review, we note that the NSA logo has been removed and that he appears to link to material that has been published in the news media.

Interim Dean Andrew Douglas has informed professor Green that the mirror site may be restored. So the university backs down, leaving many unanswered questions. Possibly, they will be addressed today. Johns Hopkins dean apologizes. Here are some on my list:. Why would an academic dean cave under pressure and send the takedown request without careful review, which would have easily discovered, for example, that the classified documents to which the blog post linked were widely available in the public domain?

Why is Johns Hopkins simultaneously saying that the event was internal to the university that the request didn't come from the government and that it doesn't know how the whole thing began?

The dean of the engineering school doesn't know who contacted him about a professor's blog post? The press office doesn't know how to get in touch with the dean?

Johns Hopkins spokesman Dennis O'Shea told me this morning that university officials "were still trying to trace" the events back to their source.

Clearly, there's a lot more to the story. Matthew Green said the original request to take down his post could have referred to his Blogger. Since a request to unpublish your thoughts is one of the most extreme and threatening that any university can make of a faculty member, what kind of deliberation went into it? That Johns Hopkins backtracked so quickly after the press started asking questions suggests that the reasoning was pretty thin. But the request was momentous.

These things don't fit together. Dennis O'Shea told me the original concern was that Matthew Green's post might be "illegally linking to classified information".

I asked him what law he was referring to. Why was it missing? In commenting critically on a subject he is expert in, and taking an independent stance that asks hard questions and puts the responsibility where it belongs, Matthew Green is doing exactly what a university faculty member is supposed to be doing.

By putting his thoughts in a blog post that anyone can read and link to, he is contributing to a vital public debate, which is exactly what universities need to be doing more often. Instead of trying to get Matthew Green's blog off their servers, the deans should be trying to get more faculty into blogging and into the public arena. Who at Johns Hopkins is speaking up for these priorities? And why isn't the Johns Hopkins faculty roaring about this issue?

I teach at New York University, and I'm furious. Matthew Green didn't get any takedown request from Google. Only from Johns Hopkins. Think about what that means for the school. He's "their" professor, yet his work is safer on the servers of a private company than his own university. The institution failed in the clutch. That it rectified it later in the day is welcome news, but I won't be cheering until we have answers that befit a great institution like Johns Hopkins, where graduate education was founded on these shores.

No one argues with that. It's one of biggest advantages this nation has. If it becomes captive to government and handmaiden to the surveillance state, that would be an economic and cultural crime of monstrous proportions. What happened to Matthew Green's blog post yesterday is no small matter. From leaks and Fisa court papers, it's clear the NSA is a bloated spying bureaucracy out of control.

It can't be reformed by insiders. Accusations that NSA is conducting intelligence-gathering operations that go beyond its core mission of national security. Registering for nothing-to-see-here deadlines could help to sound the alert when a website has been compromised.

This actually happened yesterday: Professor Matthew Green wrote on 5 September: Order by newest oldest recommendations. Show 25 25 50 All. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded. Loading comments… Trouble loading? NSA accused of spying on Brazilian oil company Petrobras.

How to foil NSA sabotage: What makes US-Israeli intelligence co-operation 'exceptional'? Microsoft and Yahoo voice alarm over NSA's assault on internet encryption.

Perhaps I'm out of step and Britons just don't think privacy is important Henry Porter.

ChurchHatesTucker profile , 9 Sep 3: Internet Zen Master profile , 9 Sep At a glance, it looks like John Hopkins has NSA-sponsored programs that are pretty much training for future cyber-security employees read: I guess the NSA probably politely asked Hopkins to have their prof take down a blog post that would make hiring new recruits even more difficult.

I doubt the NSA wants a repeat of what happened the last time they went out recruiting at a college on a campus that is a hell of a lot closer to home. Of course, that's just me making a harmless speculative guess. It would be interesting to find out the real reason though, if it's ever revealed. As the Zen Master says, "We'll see. Anonymous Anononymous Coward , 9 Sep If so, please study 'correlation and cause' whilst holding up a hand mirror to your face.

Yours Truly The Internets. NSA appears to be trying to bury everybody else head in the sand to make their revealed secrets secret again! Namel3ss profile , 9 Sep This comment has been flagged by the community. Click here to show it. The tide is slightly turning, but took real courage before to go against the masses of placid dolts who just couldn't believe that the gov't is actively evil.

I'm not bragging personally because not one who's done the work of publicizing info over the last three or so decades, but now clear that it's almost impossible to be "cranky enough" with regard to the surveillance state.

It has nearly unlimited money with which to buy research and people. That's one of the items they really wish to protect, because gives the illusion of not only separation between gov't and corporations, but that there's some varied interests in the society, instead of all under ONE over-arching conspiracy.

Spying is the main 'business model' of the internet, especially for Google and Facebook. Seriously blue, stop and think for a moment. How many people would have to know about this single giant conspiracy you keep saying exists? The odds of everyone involved being able to keep their mouths shut, or no information leaking out onto the web, are very, very low.

Rikuo profile , 9 Sep Can you explain for us just why you're so worried about Google and Facebook? Why it is that you focus so much of your attention and the thrust of your comments towards them?

No-one is worried about what those two corporations can do. They don't have police. They don't have prisons. The government is who is demanding all this information, and will then, inevitably use that information to arrest people, indeed already has what with the DEA having laundered tips they get from the NSA.

If you're so worried about Google and Facebook having your information and then passing it along, stop using them. Look to other services. There will doubtlessly be new services within the next year or two that have as part of their marketing campaign "Not based or have any ties to the US at all!

Free from NSA spying! So, as when they blocked access to the entire Guardian website http: Arthur Moore profile , 9 Sep Hmm, that's an interesting possibility. Unfortunately, having necessary military information and services sharing the same domain as self hosted websites is just a bad idea.

I'm aware that different subdomains can be completely separated, but the cost of a domain name is so cheap that it's not worth the potential trouble. The largest reason to not go with a separate domain name is shared hosting.

At that point domain names are the least of the universities security troubles. Then I hit them with a newspaper and go "Whatever you just said was less crazy than what's being confirmed as true facts right now! Hey, if we can't even find evidence of terrorists in all our data to prevent the Boston Bombings then there's NO WAY the Internet will find Matthew Green's posts criticizing us if we make him take it off the John Hopkins server.

Chris ODonnell profile , 9 Sep You would think that an agency that has already hoovered up all of MIke's email would be familiar with the Streisand Effect. Peter Henry , 9 Sep 1: Anonymous Coward , 9 Sep 4: As noted elsewhere, this sort of thing often turns out to be a ham-fisted attempt at CYA by a clueless academic administrator. At a guess, someone in the upper reaches of Johns Hopkins is worried about the NSA money spigot, and decided to preemptively lean on the Dean.

No specific NSA pressure needed. And of course, it promptly blew up in their face. As both the academic and the Dean in question perhaps hoped.

SturdyNeuronz , 10 Sep 6: The internet was formerly darpanet. It's purpose was to link. So this is not surprising.

Security Vancouver , 16 Sep 2: To censor is never a good thing! To bury, to create secrets Matthew Green said the original request to take down his post could have referred to his Blogger. Since a request to unpublish your thoughts is one of the most extreme and threatening that any university can make of a faculty member, what kind of deliberation went into it? That Johns Hopkins backtracked so quickly after the press started asking questions suggests that the reasoning was pretty thin.

But the request was momentous. These things don't fit together. Dennis O'Shea told me the original concern was that Matthew Green's post might be "illegally linking to classified information". I asked him what law he was referring to. Why was it missing? In commenting critically on a subject he is expert in, and taking an independent stance that asks hard questions and puts the responsibility where it belongs, Matthew Green is doing exactly what a university faculty member is supposed to be doing.

By putting his thoughts in a blog post that anyone can read and link to, he is contributing to a vital public debate, which is exactly what universities need to be doing more often. Instead of trying to get Matthew Green's blog off their servers, the deans should be trying to get more faculty into blogging and into the public arena. Who at Johns Hopkins is speaking up for these priorities? And why isn't the Johns Hopkins faculty roaring about this issue?

I teach at New York University, and I'm furious. Matthew Green didn't get any takedown request from Google. Only from Johns Hopkins. Think about what that means for the school. He's "their" professor, yet his work is safer on the servers of a private company than his own university.

The institution failed in the clutch. That it rectified it later in the day is welcome news, but I won't be cheering until we have answers that befit a great institution like Johns Hopkins, where graduate education was founded on these shores.

No one argues with that. It's one of biggest advantages this nation has. If it becomes captive to government and handmaiden to the surveillance state, that would be an economic and cultural crime of monstrous proportions. What happened to Matthew Green's blog post yesterday is no small matter. From leaks and Fisa court papers, it's clear the NSA is a bloated spying bureaucracy out of control. It can't be reformed by insiders. Accusations that NSA is conducting intelligence-gathering operations that go beyond its core mission of national security.

Registering for nothing-to-see-here deadlines could help to sound the alert when a website has been compromised. This actually happened yesterday: Professor Matthew Green wrote on 5 September: Order by newest oldest recommendations. Show 25 25 50 All. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded.

Explore DoubleTree Baltimore's board "Johns Hopkins University" on Pinterest. | See more ideas about Johns hopkins university, Baltimore hotels and Grad parties. Baltimore Inner Harbor hotel near John Hopkins Hospital offers special rates Johns Hopkins University, Best University, Baltimore, Colleges, Fun Facts . The National Security Agency, or NSA, is prevalent in popular culture: . Find an interesting position with the NSA before attending the fair, and. Attacking the encryption used by 'the next generation of 4G phones'. . Attack of the week: FREAK (or 'factoring the NSA for fun and profit')In.