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Need bj before 2pm in Lewiston Maine


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Curriculum Committees across the network have been hard at work as Maine's summer fades slowly into the fall. As a result, all of the Senior Colleges offer a fabulous range of classes for September. You all did a wonderful job promoting your Senior Colleges and the Network! The interview is available as a podcast on the WGAN website.

Come and say hello at the MSCN table and workshop! Maine Senior College Network. University of Southern Maine.

Read in this Issue! News Items for September, List of the Senior College Network Fall classes over offerings around the state! Nealley of Maine Seniors Magazine. David is available to give one of his celebrated talks at your Senior College! What Students Need to Know. And much, much, more! Senior College Fall Programs. Penobscott Valley Senior College. South Coast Senior College. John Valley Senior College.

Western Mountains Senior College. York County Senior College. Serving in virtually every office from the least recognized to the most visible since - without expectation of acknowledgement - the Fredericks' support has been integral to the success of CSC and the communities it serves in Knox and Lincoln Counties.

The August issue of Coastal Senior College's newsletter. For those who have not climbed Bald Mountain, it tops out at about feet and a climb of about 1. The trail is more open but much of it requires care to step on or over rocks and roots. If there has been rain, parts of the trail can be muddy and it can become really slippery after many people have been on the trail. I would suggest you bring along a walking stick or poles. The last quarter mile of trail is steeper and involves traversing lots of rock ledge.

It is more like going up stair steps, sometimes two at a time. The top has an observation tower that provides a great degree view of the Rangeley Lakes and mountains and beyond.

It is well marked. If the lot is full you can park along Bald Mountain Road. There are no bathroom facilities at the trailhead. Some folks stop at the grocery store coming into Rangeley. Whatever you need to make your hike a safe and enjoyable outing. The series, sponsored by local businesses and private contributions, features talented Maine performers representing a variety of musical forms. Profits will be used to subsidize present and future lectures and concerts to benefit the community.

The following artists will perform: Led by Barney Balch, this research-based, highly skilled, and very popular 7-piece jazz band, with members from all over Maine, will present its specialty: Sunday, November 19, , 2PM - snow date Dec. An annual favorite, this Christmas concert will feature the five members of central Maine's very popular Downeast Brass, under the direction of Dwight Tibbetts, and Jay Zoller playing a restored E.

Sunday, January 7, , 2PM - snow date Jan. Don Roy is a champion fiddler with depth in many styles of fiddling; his wife, Cindy, is well known for her step dancing piano accompaniment. The Roys' musical passion lies with the French-Canadian tradition, followed closely by Celtic music.

Their ensemble will keep your toes tapping! Sunday, February 11, , 2PM - snow date Feb. In a new venture, two ensembles of ASO instrumentalists will present a series of classical pieces. Sunday, March 11, , 2PM - snow date Mar. These two a cappella groups were very well received when we featured them in , and are returning with even more performances and awards to their credit - a feel-good afternoon of skilled harmony and opportunities to sing along with over thirty talented vocalists!

The second of our jazz offerings features traditional New Orleans jazz. Led by their founder, John Page, every member of this band has a passion to play and preserve traditional New Orleans jazz by capturing the original "Preservation Hall Jazz Band" era of music - a lively afternoon! A classical pianist, Chiharu holds master's degrees in. Subscriptions 7 or more concerts at reduced rates are available by mail. For further information call , email umasc maine.

Irene Forster - Friday, September 8 at 10 a. This session will also lauch SAGE's 20th year of bringing older people together in a relaxed atmosphere to discover new things about the world and about themselves. All are welcome to this Kick Off. This fall, SAGE will offer 24 exciting courses, learning events and excursions led by local people who have a deep love and knowledge of the subject they are presenting.

Courses generally meet once a week for approximately two hours. SAGE has no entrance requirements, grades or tests, and no college background is needed. Clock found in explosion wreckage. One hundred years ago, the greatest explosion known to man until the atomic age occurred in Halifax, Nova Scotia's harbor.

Why has no one ever heard about it? Rogers, who is currently writing a novel set during that time period. The response to that tragedy by New Englanders helping our neighbors to the north, forged a strong bond that remains today.

Originally from Chicago, Rogers has lived in the Washington, D. His teaching credentials include courses in German literature and culture. He has specialized in teaching the history of the Holocaust, including a course at Bates College in Lewiston.

Rogers spoke at this venue about his appointment as the first historian for the Office of Special Investigations OSI in the criminal division of the U. Department of Justice, which assumed full jurisdiction for the investigation and prosecution of Nazi persecutors residing in the United States. He retired from the Department in March after 31 years of service. Rogers has lectured extensively on the investigation of Nazi war crimes and related topics.

His historical essays, literary criticism, poems, translations and other publications have appeared in several journals and magazines. He will share his research at the monthly luncheon program, September 8, at You must call by noon Wednesday, September 6 to reserve a lunch. This is the first of six programs planned for this academic year.

Food for Thought presentations are open to the public. This is the first of six Food For Thought presentations this year. The next one will be Friday, October 13th. We will have some fun with myth v. Then we will explore the value of seniors to Maine's economy and will discuss Generational Consumer Behavior and the Tangible Experience. He is willing to travel to your Senior College at his own expense and will deliver his talk for free. The Alt-Right On Campus: Come and say hello! The Maine Senior College Network will have a table in the exhibitors area.

Thank you to University of Maine in Augusta Senior College members for offering to help man the table! Maine Senior College Network Workshop. MSCN has been invited to run a workshop at the meeting. This workshop is only 60 minutes so unfortunately I could not invite all the Senior Colleges to participate! My thanks to the following Senior College representatives who have agreed to be part of the workshop panel:. University of Maine in Augusta Senior College. Chuck Acker and Tom Fegin. And There's More Below!

Fourteen days from when it began, 7 of 18 courses are filled. Registration for our courses will continue until a course is filled or the first day that a class meets. Courses that still have openings as of August 28 are: Introduction to Picasso, Doctors and Patients: Communication, Is It Art? Visit our website for full course descriptions, number of places still available, and easy registration!

need bj before 2pm in Lewiston Maine

Good hours, but low pay. It is nearly impossible to make a living working at BJs Wholesale club, where the highest starting salary in was under nine dollars per hour. While some managers were fine employees, there was an equal number of supervisors who micro-managed and spent more time pointing out errors rather than attempting to improve the workplace as a whole. This brought down the morale of many team members.

Daytime hours, easy to obtain full time, 1. Good place to work. TV in Breakroom to watch your shows. A fun workplace where you get to meet and greet people from all different backgrounds of life. The Co-workers were the best where we all were like family. To me there was no hard part of the job. For the most part management was good. My passion for cooking. My typical day at work was something I enjoy doing and can do very well and that's cooking.

I learned a lot as far as how some foods have to be a certain temperature to be done. Management was okay bus most of the time they weren't there and a did a wonderful job of managing myself. My co-workers were very outgoing and we taught eachother different things.

The hardest part about this job is to convince as many customers to buy your product that your demonstrating before your shift is over. The part of this job I enjoyed the most was that I already have a talent in cooking so I would use my own special ingredients to make the food taste better and the customers would ask me what I used to make it taste that way.

I would tell them and they would buy the product that I was demonstrating and the ingredients I used of my own choice to put in it. Great place to work. The job is pretty simple. You are not really monitored unless you are doing something completely wrong. It is a good place to work with good benefits. Productive and family oriented. A typical day at work is always fun and went by quick, i learned very good people skills and ways to handle almost every situation customer service has to offer.

My coworkers and management are all excellent people every one there works as a team which makes work flow smoothly. Retail isn't for me. Everyone runs into good and bad customers on a typical day, but management in this club leaves something to be desired. Underhanded and sneaky methods are used to terminate good employees who've worked with the company for many years and are receiving more than minimum wages.

Club is severely understaffed and employees are overworked; often asked to work extended hours in place of scheduling more help. I walked down a long-forgotten logging road. Within yards of the main road, the new-growth trees had reduced the logging road to barely a path in the woods.

Thanks to the new-fallen snow from the previous night, I discovered. Gun up, finger taking up slack, the safety off, I found myself staring into pig-like eyes.

Since having the beast thrash. We held that position, eyes trained on each other, for what seemed an eternity. Then Smokey suddenly moved.

I was amazed at how silent three hundred pounds of enormous animal could be, and in moments I could neither see nor hear the bear. I could not bring myself to lower Maureen, fearing a sudden charge from the trees. And my fears were not unfounded.

Suddenly — without warning — the bear reentered the clearing from behind me! This time, he was snapping his cont. Now, for the first time, I fired at the ground directly in front of the bear.

He turned and bolted into the thicket, this time making a total racket as he crashed away. I beat a hasty retreat as well. That day I had hunted solo, and, as fate would have it, I have hunted solo every season since. When I returned to camp from my face-to-face with that Maine black bear, Dad, true to his word, had supper ready for me. I remember that meal especially fondly, in part because I was safe again, but mostly because it was fixed for me by my dad, the man who taught me about hunting and the Great Maine Woods.

Public Library in Rangeley. An abundance of sugar maple trees in the Moosehead Lake region has made this prime territory for harvesting sap. The township of Jackman, which encompasses land due west of Moosehead Lake, has a long history of maple syrup production.

Like a fine wine, the flavor of maple syrup will vary from different areas due to climate, soil type, and moisture content. It is the good fortune for the Jackman region that the conditions are per-. Maine maple syrup is considered the finest tasting maple syrup in the world.

Large corporations have made many attempts to modify the flavor of their artificial maple syrup, but the devoted Maine maple syrup connoisseurs will only use an authentic Maine syrup on their wild blueberry pancakes.

The history of maple syrup began with the Native Americans who inhabited the forested lands of Maine. According to Native American lore, there once was a great Native American chief who was respected for both his warrior and. This chief was extremely proficient at throwing his tomahawk, and would practice regularly with the sharp axe by using the trees of the forest as targets.

One late winter day when the warmth of the sun gave hope that spring would be arriving soon, the chief took careful aim at a maple tree, and buried the sharp point of the tomahawk deep into the bark. When the chief went to remove the tomahawk from the tree, he was surprised to find a sweet liquid that was dripping from the wound in the bark of the tree.

In retrospect, perhaps the wife of the chief is due most of the credit for what cont. It was then that the wife of the chief decided to cook a piece of venison in the sweet-flavored liquid, and when the chief tasted the delicious cooked venison, he was delighted. The liquid was maple sap, and the Native American tribes throughout the area harvested the seasonable maple sap. As the frigid winter begins to lose its icy grip on the forest when spring is approaching, the hardy maple tree will send nourishing sap upwards to the ends of the branches, where the buds will ultimately appear.

This sap will travel through the maple tree when the. A temperature change effectively creates a pressure change inside the tree, which will force the sap to travel upward to the branches during the duration of the warming. When the air temperature drops below freezing at night, a natural suction will develop that water from deep within the ground, and thus replenishing the sap within the tree.

This sap will continue to migrate upwards into the tree until the night temperatures eventually rise above the freezing mark. When it was learned that the maple tree would produce sap during the warming days of late winter and early spring, the Native Americans began to regularly harvest the sweet liquid. They discovered that boiling and con-.

This boiling of the sap was accomplished by heating rocks to an extreme heat, then placing the heated rocks inside a section of hollowed out tree log that held the collected sap. Maple trees were not indigenous to Europe, so the early settlers that arrived from Europe had no previous knowledge of the sweet liquid sap that was present in the trees.

Fortunately, this knowledge of collecting sap was passed from the Native Americans to the arriving settlers, who would ultimately modify and adjust how the sap was collected and boiled. The boiling process was greatly simplified because the European settlers arrived with durable metal cooking vats and containers, so the concept of heating rocks to place in the sap was no longer necessary.

Maple sap would now be boiled with wood-fueled fires. The Native Americans educated the settlers about the maple trees, and how the liquid sap was only found in what is called the sapwood, which is the outer portion of the trunk of the tree directly underneath the bark. To effectively harvest this sap, a tap was inserted into the sapwood. The change in temperature creates a pressure change in the maple tree which forces the sap out of the tree where the tap was located.

Native American taps were originally sharpened hardwood spikes, or narrow pieces of stone that were pounded into the sapwood to form a v-shape incision. After the cut was created, concave pieces of bark or reeds were pushed into the incision. A hand crafted container was hung underneath the tap to collect the dripping sap. As time went by, the European settlers, who were now becoming resourceful residents of the forested land, would begin to fashion metal taps.

Understandably, the settlers that. This maple syrup was collected and processed for their own use, and later as word spread about the sweet liquid substance from the northeast forests, the resourceful maple syrup harvesters were marketing this sweet substance to others outside the region. Maple syrup rapidly gained popularity for its use on pancakes, and would be infused into many different cooking recipes. Longer durations of boiling the sap would remove most of the moisture content, and produce a crystalized sugar sweetener product.

Maple sugar became so popular that it would become the most used form of sweetener in the United States until the sugar cane industry started in the Caribbean Islands in the s. The onset of the Civil War would create a surge in maple sugar use, because residents of. Even after the Civil War ended, renewed access to the cheap Caribbean Island sugar would not have much of a long term impact on the sale of maple sweetener. A loyal fan base had now been established for maple sweetener, and Mainers would continue to produce the product.

It was hard physical work in the north woods of Maine where the deep snowpack would often linger well into the spring. A lot of sap had to be collected to process into maple syrup.

Approximately 40 gallons of boiled sap will yield 1 gallon of maple syrup, and many pails of collected sap had to be lugged back to the shed. To make the process easier, horses were often put into use to help haul the sap out of the forest. Later, trucks would be utilized to transport the sap out of the forest.

The sapping season is short, cont. Our own maple syrup, candies and treats. A family tradition since ! A considerable amount of sap was collected and processed for personal use, and some enterprising residents would establish functional maple syrup business operations.

By the late s sugar shacks were common throughout much of the forested areas of Maine, and resourceful maple syrup producers would begin using large evaporators to simplify the sap boiling process. The first evaporator used for the purpose of processing maple sap was patented in Improved versions that allowed for quicker evaporation would be used in the early s, and that technology has been updated for continued use today.

Production of maple syrup in Maine continues to this date throughout the state, with the Jackman area being a. Give someone a special gift that will be enjoyed all year long Maine Maple Products Association has five established maple syrup producers in the Jackman area. Recently joining those maple syrup producers is the Native American Passamaquoddy tribe, who are returning to their original heritage of harvesting sap. Maine is the third largest commercial producer of maple syrup in the United States, with approximately , gallons produced for sale every year.

Early view of Water Street in Skowhegan. The Willows in Skowhegan. Custom Built Homes Sales and service by a family who cares! Early view of the stone yard in Jay. McAllister Accounting And Tax Services Serving your business and personal tax planning and preparation needs for over 30 years. Whitcomb Antique Dealer in Waterville. He knew as much or more about the subject as anyone in New England, though As far as books on horses are concerned, Parlin did author one: If the publishing date makes you think the work is nothing more than an obscure, moth-eaten old text representative of a time long-gone, think again.

The price reflects brilliant color illustrations. Besides books on the general subject of horse breeding, the company published the definitive periodical on the subject of horse breeding in New England and the Middle Atlantic States, American Horse Breeder. American Horse Breeder was a Boston-based weekly. It was published from to It was a classy magazine. You can find bound copies by year in major libraries.

Single issues are desirable collectibles. The magazine put out attractive full-color 20 x 30 posters for Christmas and other occasions. So who was Simon Parlin and just what is his connection to Maine?

What is it that makes his story interesting beyond the fact he was the knowledgeable editor of a once-prestigious but highly specialized magazine? Well, to begin with, Simon Parlin was a largely self-educated man. Offering full service grooming to all breeds of dogs.

We board your dogs, cats, or critters. Dogs are walked daily and are housed in clean, comfortable runs with access to individual outdoor runs. In-floor heat and air conditioning. Some of it relates to the time he was as yet unborn, still in the womb. Simon Parlin, the father, died three months before our subject was born. Simon Parlin, our subject, spent the first year of his life at the head of the class Infant Simon went right into the classroom with his mother.

Simon Parlin was born in East Wilton on April 17, His father was just twenty-seven at the time of his. When Simon was born his mother was twenty-five. She was born March 28, , in Temple. She married Simon Parlin April 7, Simon died in Wilton on January 27, With the death of her husband Dorcas Parlin had to find a way to support herself and her child.

A reasonably well-for the times-educated woman, Dorcas found employment teaching in Phillips thanks to Ebenezer Whitney. He was a veteran of the War of At fifty-one he owned a prosperous farm as well as a sawmill. Whitney was also something of a civil engineer. He laid out many of the early roads of Phillips. The first road to Rangeley was his.

Never having married, he lived with two unmarried sisters. Ebenezer Whitney was the school agent for his district school. It was Whitney who hired Dorcas Parlin to teach in Phillips. Clearly, he made a good choice. Dorcas went on to teach seventy-two terms. She retired when she was seventy.

Dorcas Parlin had a stipulation to her being hired. Dorcas agreed to teach if Ebenezer Whitney would make a cradle for her baby.

Ebenezer made the cradle. Dorcas then took her baby into the schoolroom with her. There is a bit of an aside to the little tale above. Ebenezer Whitney married Dorcas Parlin. The wedding took place December 26, The couple went on to have three children, John, Charles and Myra. This was the home where Simon Parlin was brought up. Simon Parlin went on to become a teacher himself, and in Phillips. His unit was Co. D, 28th Maine Infantry.

He enlisted as a private and was mustered out a sergeant. He saw action at Port Hudson and other battles. He then reenlisted in Company F, 2nd Maine Cavalry. His rank was lieutenant. He took part in the capture of Fort Blakely and was a part of the occupation force of Mobile, Alabama. The Union cavalry provided Parlin with his first in-depth exposure to horses. The couple had the first of their children in Phillips: Simon again taught school.

He also took over operation of the Hoyt family farm. Somerville would eventually become their permanent home. It was with the magazine he found his true vocation and great love, an in-depth involvement with the breeding of quality horses, primarily trotters. He died leaving an indelible mark on the world of horse breeding in the northeast and beyond. She died on April 1, John had moved to Franklin, Massachusetts.

Discover Maine Magazine has been brought to you free through the generous support of Maine businesses for the past 26 years, and we extend a special thanks to them.

Please tell our advertisers how much you love Discover Maine Magazine by doing business with them whenever possible. That land is what is now Mexico and Dixfield. In the towns separated; Dixfield was incorporated, and Holmanstown kept its name and continued to be governed as a plantation until February 13, when it was incorporated into a town named Mexico.

One reason given for naming the town Mexico is that the inspiration was derived from the valiant Mexican spirit in gaining independence from Spain. Board of Selectmen member Richie Philbrick spoke, giving the history of how the town of Mexico came to be. Congratulating the town on its Birthday Celebration, he also stated that there are five states with a town of Mexico in them. On April 4,Congress decided on the the U. Medical Corps was formed May 28th the first steam vessel to sail the Great Lakes was launched December 3, Illinois became the 21st State.

From the start there have been special people from this town that have had an impact. He was not only a great asset to different businesses and community organizations but to the state of Maine and the United States as an Olympic skier, President of the Chisholm Ski Club of Black Mountain, and a veteran serving his country as a member of the 10th Mountain Division.

Moving forward, the town of Mexico should remember its traditions and act upon them for years to come. With speeches over, a Congressional sentiment from each office was given to Town Manager Jack Gaudet. The Bicentennial Committee has events planned for the whole year. Early street view of the post office in Kingfield. Dwight Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States and former five-star general, would arrive in western Maine on June 25, The visit to Maine was a nonpolitical event, and a much needed reprieve from the rigors of the oval office.

Tensions had been high following that event, and a grim reminder that the United States was firmly en-. President Eisenhower required a change of pace, and the fresh air of Maine would serve the purpose.

Dwight Eisenhower had been instilled with a love of the outdoors since childhood, and he especially loved fly fishing. He was a skilled angler very adept at casting a bamboo fly rod. With fly rod in his hand, Eisenhower was proficient at delivering a hand-tied fishing fly to the wary trout that hid in the water. The tranquility of the water provided a peace that Eisenhower required on a reoccurring basis to decompress an overworked mind.

Eisenhower had caught many trout during his lifetime, but this was his first trip to the fabled brook trout fishing waters of Maine. Since the end of the s, these brook trout were sought after by many anglers, as this fish was capable of achieving record sizes in the pure waters of Maine.

Another species of fish that Eisenhower had never caught on a fly rod before was the legendary landlocked salmon. Considered the king of the gamefish, it was not an easy task to capture this fish. Landlocked salmon are cunning, fast and powerful. Many of them are never brought to net because of their uncanny ability to escape after being hooked. These landlocked salmon intrigued Eisenhower, and the president was determined to catch one.

To accomplish a successful fishing trip for the President of the United States, a capable veteran Maine guide was needed who was up to the task. Maine guide Don Cameron would accompany Eisenhower on his fly fishing trips. For what must have been like two glorious days for the president, Eisenhower would stay at a cabin owned by the Parmachenee Club on the shoreline of Lake Parmachenee.

Eisenhower would spend hours fishing with Maine guide Don Cameron, and he would skillfully introduce the president to the cont. Lake Access by Boat! Among the locations fished was the Magalloway River. The deep dark water of this well-known fishing pool would provide success for the president, and his trophy fish for the trip was a 3 pound, 18 inch landlocked salmon.

Eisenhower bonded with Maine fishing guide Don Cameron on a level of companionship that was linked by their passion of fishing. On the edge of the water, the two men with very different lifestyles were linked as fly fishermen brothers.

The friendship stayed intact long after Eisenhower departed Maine. He would correspond through many letters with Cameron, and the topic would always be about fishing. President Eisenhower possessed many skills, and among these was the fact that he was a gifted artist.

The president would ultimately paint a beautiful portrait of Don Cameron, which was. Thirty members of the press were traveling with the president on that fishing trip, and at the end of the day, a cookout was arranged.

In typical Maine fashion, a traditional Maine guide shore diner was prepared with grilled brook trout and baked beans. President Eisenhower cringed when he saw how some of the first brook trout, were being prepared a bit too overcooked for the table. Taking matters into his own hands, Eisenhower seasoned the fresh brook trout with bacon, and wrapped the fish in foil. After a few minutes of expertly cooking the brook trout, he gleefully shared the delicious fish with those around him.

Fishing trips always end, but the memories of that successful fly fishing trip in western Maine would stay with Eisenhower forever. On June 27, the President of the United States. This visit was incredible for the residents of Rangeley.

Never in their dreams did they imagine that the President of the United States would set foot in their town. Every resident stopped their daily routine, and went to the presidential ceremony. Eisenhower was welcomed to Rangeley with much admiration from everyone. A month-old whitetail deer fawn was to be given to the president by 12year old Candy Tibbetts, who was the daughter of Mr. Verde Tibbetts of Rangeley, Maine.

The girl had memorized a prepared speech for the event, but when the president stepped out of the presidential car, the little girl froze with stage fright. Imagine what was going. The President of the United States is standing before me. Her memorized speech evaporated into the air, and she stood there with her mouth agape. The kindly President Eisenhower walked up to the girl, bent down and gently whispered the words of her memorized speech into her ear.

Softly, she repeated the words out loud, and presented the fawn as a gift from the children of Rangeley, Maine to the Washington, D. Now I hope the deer likes its new home too. But it may be like a lot of other folks that go to Washington. They find out they have left a lot behind. But I will take it down. I would suggest you bring along a walking stick or poles. The last quarter mile of trail is steeper and involves traversing lots of rock ledge.

It is more like going up stair steps, sometimes two at a time. The top has an observation tower that provides a great degree view of the Rangeley Lakes and mountains and beyond. It is well marked. If the lot is full you can park along Bald Mountain Road. There are no bathroom facilities at the trailhead. Some folks stop at the grocery store coming into Rangeley. Whatever you need to make your hike a safe and enjoyable outing. The series, sponsored by local businesses and private contributions, features talented Maine performers representing a variety of musical forms.

Profits will be used to subsidize present and future lectures and concerts to benefit the community. The following artists will perform: Led by Barney Balch, this research-based, highly skilled, and very popular 7-piece jazz band, with members from all over Maine, will present its specialty: Sunday, November 19, , 2PM - snow date Dec.

An annual favorite, this Christmas concert will feature the five members of central Maine's very popular Downeast Brass, under the direction of Dwight Tibbetts, and Jay Zoller playing a restored E. Sunday, January 7, , 2PM - snow date Jan. Don Roy is a champion fiddler with depth in many styles of fiddling; his wife, Cindy, is well known for her step dancing piano accompaniment.

The Roys' musical passion lies with the French-Canadian tradition, followed closely by Celtic music. Their ensemble will keep your toes tapping! Sunday, February 11, , 2PM - snow date Feb.

In a new venture, two ensembles of ASO instrumentalists will present a series of classical pieces. Sunday, March 11, , 2PM - snow date Mar. These two a cappella groups were very well received when we featured them in , and are returning with even more performances and awards to their credit - a feel-good afternoon of skilled harmony and opportunities to sing along with over thirty talented vocalists!

The second of our jazz offerings features traditional New Orleans jazz. Led by their founder, John Page, every member of this band has a passion to play and preserve traditional New Orleans jazz by capturing the original "Preservation Hall Jazz Band" era of music - a lively afternoon! A classical pianist, Chiharu holds master's degrees in. Subscriptions 7 or more concerts at reduced rates are available by mail. For further information call , email umasc maine. Irene Forster - Friday, September 8 at 10 a.

This session will also lauch SAGE's 20th year of bringing older people together in a relaxed atmosphere to discover new things about the world and about themselves. All are welcome to this Kick Off. This fall, SAGE will offer 24 exciting courses, learning events and excursions led by local people who have a deep love and knowledge of the subject they are presenting. Courses generally meet once a week for approximately two hours. SAGE has no entrance requirements, grades or tests, and no college background is needed.

Clock found in explosion wreckage. One hundred years ago, the greatest explosion known to man until the atomic age occurred in Halifax, Nova Scotia's harbor. Why has no one ever heard about it? Rogers, who is currently writing a novel set during that time period.

The response to that tragedy by New Englanders helping our neighbors to the north, forged a strong bond that remains today.

Originally from Chicago, Rogers has lived in the Washington, D. His teaching credentials include courses in German literature and culture.

Issuu is a digital publishing platform that makes it simple to publish magazines, catalogs, newspapers, books, and more online. Easily share your publications and get them in front of Issuu’s. LOUISIANA OBITUARIES OF ALFORDS. AND SPELLING VARIATIONS. First Names: A – J. Obituaries are listed alphabetically by FIRST name. Included are people whose last name, maiden name, or married name is Alford or a spelling variation: Alfred, Alvord, Allford, Halford, Hallford, Holford, etc. We would like to show you a description here but the site won’t allow us.