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Women in Russian society have a rich and varied history during numerous regimes throughout the centuries. It is important to note that since Russia is a multicultural society, the experiences of women in Russia vary significantly across ethnic, racial, religious, and social lines.

The life of an ethnic Russian woman can be dramatically different from the life of a Bashkir , Chechen , or Yakuts Sakha woman; just as the life of a woman from a lower-class rural family can be different from the life of a woman from an upper-middle-class urban family. Nevertheless, a common historical and political context provides a room for speaking about women in Russia in general. Archaeological evidence suggests that the present day territory of Russia was inhabited since prehistoric times: For most of the 20th century, the history of Russia is essentially that of the Soviet Union.

Its fall in led, as in most of the former communist bloc countries of Eastern Europe, to an economic collapse and other social problems. Women in Russia are not a monolithic group, because the country itself is very diverse: Women of eighteenth-century Russia were luckier than their European counterparts in some ways; in others, the life of a Russian woman was more difficult.

The eighteenth-century was a time of social and legal changes that began to affect women in a way that they had never before experienced. Peter the Great ruled Russia from — and in that time brought about many changes to Russian culture, altering the orthodox traditions that had been observed since the fall of the Byzantine Empire. The three major social classes present during these reforms experienced changes in varying degrees according to their proximity to the tsar and urban settings where reforms could be more strictly enforced.

Large cities underwent the westernization process more rapidly and successfully than the outlying rural villages. Noblewomen, merchant class women, and peasant serf women each witnessed Petrine reforms differently. The Petrine reforms of this century allowed for more female participation in society, when before they were merely an afterthought as wives and mothers. The law was supposed to help the tax revenue for Russia by banning the allowance of noble families to divide their land and wealth among multiple children.

This law effectively ended the practice of excluding women from inheriting patrimonial estates. The law mandated that if a man was survived by unmarried daughters, the eldest girl would inherit his estate, while the remaining sisters would divide his movable property. His married daughters would receive nothing, however, since they would have received dowries at the time they married.

In Anna Ivanova revoked the Law of Single Inheritance, as it had been a major point of contestation among the nobility since Peter first announced it in After , property rights were expanded to include inheritance in land property. It also gave women greater power over the estates in that had been willed to them, or received in their wedding dowry. In pre-Petrine centuries the Russian tsars had never been concerned with educating their people, neither the wealthy nor the serfs.

Education for girls occurred mainly in the home because they were focused on learning about their duties as wife and mother rather than getting an education. Petersburg and then the Novodevichii Institute for the daughters of commoners.

In the eighteenth-century Petrine reforms and enlightenment ideas brought both welcome and unwelcome changes required of the Russian nobility and aristocratic families. Daughters in well-to-do families were raised in the terem, which was usually a separate building connected to the house by an outside passageway.

These girls were raised solely on the prospect of marrying to connect their own family to another aristocratic family. Many rural and urban lower classes houses had no space to separate young women so there was no designated terem to keep them isolated. Women of lower classes had to live and work with their brothers, fathers, and husbands as well as manage all household matters along with them.

Merchant class women also enjoyed newly granted freedoms to own property and manage it; with this new right upper class women gained more independence from their patriarchal restrictions. A life among the peasant class was hard whether that peasant was male or female; each led lives filled with strenuous labor. They participated in work in the fields and in the making of handicrafts. During planting and harvest time, when help was needed in the fields, women worked with their husbands to plow, sow seeds, then collect and prepare the crops.

In the harsh climate of the Russian steppe, and a life of labor from an early age, perhaps half of all children would live to adulthood. As she continued to bear sons, her status further improved. Having a son ensured that the family name would continue as well as any property they might own, though as Petrine reforms came into effect, it began to be equally profitable to have a girl.

However, women of any class could turn infrequently to the ecclesiastical courts to resolve their marital conflicts. By the mid-nineteenth century, European notions of equality were starting to take hold in Russia. Petersburg University allowed women to audit its courses, but the policy was revoked just four years later.

In the s a feminist movement began to coalesce in St. It was led by Anna Filosofova , Nadezhda Stasova , and Mariia Trubnikova , who together were known as the "triumvirate. By the early s Russia boasted more female doctors, lawyers, and teachers than almost any country in Europe—a fact noted with admiration by many foreign visitors.

However, most of these educational benefits were being reaped by urban women from the middle and upper classes. While literacy rates were slowly spreading throughout the country, educational and other opportunities for peasant women were still relatively few. The League made universal women's suffrage its primary goal, and under Shishkina-Iavein's leadership the women's suffrage movement gained a great deal of popular support, both in Russia and abroad.

In March , the Provisional Government, which had replaced Nicholas II 's autocracy, granted Russia's women the right to vote and hold political office. It was the first such reform enacted by a major political power. These expectations were in addition to the standards demanded of them in the domestic sphere. The legal equality of women and men was established during the Bolshevik revolution in Lenin saw women as a force of labor, that had previously been untapped and encouraged women to partake in the communist revolution.

The number of women who entered the work force rose from , in to , in To achieve this increase of women in the work force, the new communist government issued the First Family Code. This code separated marriage from the church, allowed a couple to choose a surname, gave illegitimate children the same rights as legitimate children, gave rights to maternal entitlements, health and safety protections at work, and provided women with the right to a divorce on extended grounds.

Labor laws also assisted women. Women were given equal rights in regards to insurance in case of illness, eight-week paid maternity-leave, and a minimum wage standard that was set for both men and women.

Both sexes were also afforded paid holiday leave. While the reality was that not all women were granted these rights, they established a pivot from the traditional systems of the Russian imperialist. In , with the number of divorces increasing, Zhenotdel created the second family plan, proposing a common law marriage for couples that were living together.

However, a year later, the government created a marriage law as a reaction to the de facto marriages that were causing inequality for women. Men had no legal ties and as such, if a woman got pregnant, he would be able to leave, and not be legally responsible to assist the woman or child; this led to an increase in the number of homeless children. By , the Zhenotdel was disbanded, as the government claimed that their work was completed. Women began to enter the Soviet workforce at a scale that had never before been seen.

However, in the mids, there was a return to the more traditional and conservative values in many areas of social and family policy. Abortion was made illegal, homosexuality was declared a crime, legal differences between legitimate and illegitimate children were restored, and divorce was once again difficult to attain.

Women held the social responsibility of motherhood that could not be ignored. Some local women's organizations also existed. For example, a group of Azeri bolshevik women in the Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic founded the Ali Bayramov Club , a women's club dedicated to the unveiling of Muslim women, promoting female literacy, giving women opportunities for vocational training and employment, and organizing leisure and cultural events.

During Stalinist Russia, women also fell victim to the Great Purge that plagued the country. From , the number of women that were gulag prisoners rose from 30, to , During WWII , women exemplified the motherland and patriotism. Many became widowed during the war, making them more likely to be become impoverished. As men were called away to assist with the fighting, women stepped in and became in charge of state farms and large collective farms.

In , to meet harvest quotas, over half of the agricultural labor force was made up of women. They were not only assuming roles on collective farms, but 8, girls went into the Red army and Soviet navy to assist in the Great Patriotic War. The ban on abortion was repealed in - after almost 20 years of prohibition, abortion became legal again.

Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova Russian: Before her recruitment as cosmonaut, Tereshkova was a textile factory assembly worker and an amateur skydiver. In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force and thus she also became the first civilian to fly in space.

During her three-day mission, she performed various tests on herself to collect data on the female body's reaction to spaceflight. The Soviet Constitution supported women's rights both in public life Art 35 and in family life art Art Yet, the Constitution was somewhat contradictory: Most of the nominal state benefit programs for women continued into the post-Soviet era.

However, as in the Soviet era, Russian women in the s predominated in economic sectors where pay is low, and they continued to receive less pay than men for comparable positions. In men in health care earned an average of 50 percent more than women in that field, and male engineers received an average of 40 percent more than their female colleagues.

Despite that, on average, women were better educated than men, women remained in the minority in senior management positions. In the later Soviet era, women's wages averaged 70 percent of men's; by the figure was 40 percent, according to the Moscow-based Center for Gender Studies. According to a report, 87 percent of employed urban Russians earning less than , rubles a month were women, and the percentage of women decreased consistently in the higher wage categories.

According to reports, women generally are the first to be fired, and they face other forms of on-the-job discrimination as well. Struggling companies often fire women to avoid paying child care benefits or granting maternity leave, as the law still requires. In women constituted an estimated 70 percent of Russia's unemployed, and as much as 90 percent in some areas. Sociological surveys show that sexual harassment and violence against women increased at all levels of society in the s.

More than 13, rapes were reported in , meaning that several times that number of that often-unreported crime probably were committed. In an estimated 14, women were murdered by their husbands or lovers, [42] about twenty times the figure in the United States and several times the figure in Russia five years earlier.

More than , other types of crimes, including spousal abuse, were committed against women in ; in the State Duma the lower house of the Federal Assembly, Russia's parliament drafted a law against domestic violence.

Independent women's organizations, a form of activity suppressed in the Soviet era, were formed in large numbers in the s at the local, regional, and national levels. One such group is the Center for Gender Studies, a private research institute. The center analyzes demographic and social problems of women and acts as a link between Russian and Western feminist groups.

A traveling group called Feminist Alternative offers women assertiveness training.

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We are tigers in the sack, and our sex game is like no other. Why do so many men choose Russian escorts? But with our long legs, voluptuous hair, and bright-red lipstick, Russian women are extremely open-minded and dirty. We like sex, and we love money. And unlike American women, we know how to multi-task in the sack. If that fantasy includes a smoking hot Russian escort, your wife definitely cannot play.

Half of these politicians have tons of money, and their wives are too stuck up to get wild in the boudoir. What they really want is a kinky Russian — talking dirty and spanking away. A few days ago, I heard they are giving classes in Russia on how to grab a rich man, and how to make him stay happy if you know what I mean.

I know a lot of Russian and Ukrainian girls who come here, stay here for a few months and leave having made as much as lawyers do in a year. For most of the 20th century, the history of Russia is essentially that of the Soviet Union. Its fall in led, as in most of the former communist bloc countries of Eastern Europe, to an economic collapse and other social problems. Women in Russia are not a monolithic group, because the country itself is very diverse: Women of eighteenth-century Russia were luckier than their European counterparts in some ways; in others, the life of a Russian woman was more difficult.

The eighteenth-century was a time of social and legal changes that began to affect women in a way that they had never before experienced. Peter the Great ruled Russia from — and in that time brought about many changes to Russian culture, altering the orthodox traditions that had been observed since the fall of the Byzantine Empire. The three major social classes present during these reforms experienced changes in varying degrees according to their proximity to the tsar and urban settings where reforms could be more strictly enforced.

Large cities underwent the westernization process more rapidly and successfully than the outlying rural villages. Noblewomen, merchant class women, and peasant serf women each witnessed Petrine reforms differently.

The Petrine reforms of this century allowed for more female participation in society, when before they were merely an afterthought as wives and mothers. The law was supposed to help the tax revenue for Russia by banning the allowance of noble families to divide their land and wealth among multiple children.

This law effectively ended the practice of excluding women from inheriting patrimonial estates. The law mandated that if a man was survived by unmarried daughters, the eldest girl would inherit his estate, while the remaining sisters would divide his movable property. His married daughters would receive nothing, however, since they would have received dowries at the time they married. In Anna Ivanova revoked the Law of Single Inheritance, as it had been a major point of contestation among the nobility since Peter first announced it in After , property rights were expanded to include inheritance in land property.

It also gave women greater power over the estates in that had been willed to them, or received in their wedding dowry. In pre-Petrine centuries the Russian tsars had never been concerned with educating their people, neither the wealthy nor the serfs. Education for girls occurred mainly in the home because they were focused on learning about their duties as wife and mother rather than getting an education.

Petersburg and then the Novodevichii Institute for the daughters of commoners. In the eighteenth-century Petrine reforms and enlightenment ideas brought both welcome and unwelcome changes required of the Russian nobility and aristocratic families. Daughters in well-to-do families were raised in the terem, which was usually a separate building connected to the house by an outside passageway.

These girls were raised solely on the prospect of marrying to connect their own family to another aristocratic family. Many rural and urban lower classes houses had no space to separate young women so there was no designated terem to keep them isolated. Women of lower classes had to live and work with their brothers, fathers, and husbands as well as manage all household matters along with them.

Merchant class women also enjoyed newly granted freedoms to own property and manage it; with this new right upper class women gained more independence from their patriarchal restrictions.

A life among the peasant class was hard whether that peasant was male or female; each led lives filled with strenuous labor.

They participated in work in the fields and in the making of handicrafts. During planting and harvest time, when help was needed in the fields, women worked with their husbands to plow, sow seeds, then collect and prepare the crops. In the harsh climate of the Russian steppe, and a life of labor from an early age, perhaps half of all children would live to adulthood. As she continued to bear sons, her status further improved. Having a son ensured that the family name would continue as well as any property they might own, though as Petrine reforms came into effect, it began to be equally profitable to have a girl.

However, women of any class could turn infrequently to the ecclesiastical courts to resolve their marital conflicts. By the mid-nineteenth century, European notions of equality were starting to take hold in Russia. Petersburg University allowed women to audit its courses, but the policy was revoked just four years later. In the s a feminist movement began to coalesce in St. It was led by Anna Filosofova , Nadezhda Stasova , and Mariia Trubnikova , who together were known as the "triumvirate.

By the early s Russia boasted more female doctors, lawyers, and teachers than almost any country in Europe—a fact noted with admiration by many foreign visitors. However, most of these educational benefits were being reaped by urban women from the middle and upper classes.

While literacy rates were slowly spreading throughout the country, educational and other opportunities for peasant women were still relatively few. The League made universal women's suffrage its primary goal, and under Shishkina-Iavein's leadership the women's suffrage movement gained a great deal of popular support, both in Russia and abroad. In March , the Provisional Government, which had replaced Nicholas II 's autocracy, granted Russia's women the right to vote and hold political office.

It was the first such reform enacted by a major political power. These expectations were in addition to the standards demanded of them in the domestic sphere. The legal equality of women and men was established during the Bolshevik revolution in Lenin saw women as a force of labor, that had previously been untapped and encouraged women to partake in the communist revolution.

The number of women who entered the work force rose from , in to , in To achieve this increase of women in the work force, the new communist government issued the First Family Code. This code separated marriage from the church, allowed a couple to choose a surname, gave illegitimate children the same rights as legitimate children, gave rights to maternal entitlements, health and safety protections at work, and provided women with the right to a divorce on extended grounds.

Labor laws also assisted women. Women were given equal rights in regards to insurance in case of illness, eight-week paid maternity-leave, and a minimum wage standard that was set for both men and women. Both sexes were also afforded paid holiday leave. While the reality was that not all women were granted these rights, they established a pivot from the traditional systems of the Russian imperialist. In , with the number of divorces increasing, Zhenotdel created the second family plan, proposing a common law marriage for couples that were living together.

However, a year later, the government created a marriage law as a reaction to the de facto marriages that were causing inequality for women. Men had no legal ties and as such, if a woman got pregnant, he would be able to leave, and not be legally responsible to assist the woman or child; this led to an increase in the number of homeless children. By , the Zhenotdel was disbanded, as the government claimed that their work was completed.

Women began to enter the Soviet workforce at a scale that had never before been seen. However, in the mids, there was a return to the more traditional and conservative values in many areas of social and family policy. Abortion was made illegal, homosexuality was declared a crime, legal differences between legitimate and illegitimate children were restored, and divorce was once again difficult to attain.

Women held the social responsibility of motherhood that could not be ignored. Some local women's organizations also existed. For example, a group of Azeri bolshevik women in the Azerbaijan Soviet Socialist Republic founded the Ali Bayramov Club , a women's club dedicated to the unveiling of Muslim women, promoting female literacy, giving women opportunities for vocational training and employment, and organizing leisure and cultural events. During Stalinist Russia, women also fell victim to the Great Purge that plagued the country.

From , the number of women that were gulag prisoners rose from 30, to , During WWII , women exemplified the motherland and patriotism. Many became widowed during the war, making them more likely to be become impoverished. As men were called away to assist with the fighting, women stepped in and became in charge of state farms and large collective farms. In , to meet harvest quotas, over half of the agricultural labor force was made up of women.

They were not only assuming roles on collective farms, but 8, girls went into the Red army and Soviet navy to assist in the Great Patriotic War. The ban on abortion was repealed in - after almost 20 years of prohibition, abortion became legal again.

Valentina Vladimirovna Tereshkova Russian: Before her recruitment as cosmonaut, Tereshkova was a textile factory assembly worker and an amateur skydiver. In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force and thus she also became the first civilian to fly in space. During her three-day mission, she performed various tests on herself to collect data on the female body's reaction to spaceflight.

The Soviet Constitution supported women's rights both in public life Art 35 and in family life art Art Yet, the Constitution was somewhat contradictory: Most of the nominal state benefit programs for women continued into the post-Soviet era. However, as in the Soviet era, Russian women in the s predominated in economic sectors where pay is low, and they continued to receive less pay than men for comparable positions.

In men in health care earned an average of 50 percent more than women in that field, and male engineers received an average of 40 percent more than their female colleagues. Despite that, on average, women were better educated than men, women remained in the minority in senior management positions.

In the later Soviet era, women's wages averaged 70 percent of men's; by the figure was 40 percent, according to the Moscow-based Center for Gender Studies. According to a report, 87 percent of employed urban Russians earning less than , rubles a month were women, and the percentage of women decreased consistently in the higher wage categories.

According to reports, women generally are the first to be fired, and they face other forms of on-the-job discrimination as well.

Struggling companies often fire women to avoid paying child care benefits or granting maternity leave, as the law still requires. In women constituted an estimated 70 percent of Russia's unemployed, and as much as 90 percent in some areas.

Sociological surveys show that sexual harassment and violence against women increased at all levels of society in the s.

More than 13, rapes were reported in , meaning that several times that number of that often-unreported crime probably were committed. In an estimated 14, women were murdered by their husbands or lovers, [42] about twenty times the figure in the United States and several times the figure in Russia five years earlier.

More than , other types of crimes, including spousal abuse, were committed against women in ; in the State Duma the lower house of the Federal Assembly, Russia's parliament drafted a law against domestic violence.

She calls herself “the missing link in the connection between Russia and Navalny wanted to find out who the women were and who had sent. I'm looking for a partner who'll Moscow City, Moskva, Russia Seeking: Male 21 - 34 for Romance / Dating. I'm a sweet girl who's looking for a man to protect. Peskov said if the allegations against Slutsky were true, the women should have spoken out sooner, No, they wanted to earn $10m. In Russia, sexual harassment is often dismissed as harmless banter, and last week, the.