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We met at dick s in Williams Lake


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This is a complete list of all inductees in the BC Cowboy Hall of Fame, including a short biography and a photo of each inductee. Scroll down or click on any of the following years! Return to the Hall of Fame.

Scroll down or click on any of the following names! Jimmy McDonnell "He worked on good ranches, broke a 'jillion' colts, rode broncs, and trained world-calibre cutting horses. He was ranch cowboy, rodeo cowboy, horseman, and showman: They don't make 'em like Jimmy anymore - a cowboy in everyones eyes! In he was breaking horses for Jack Dubois and over the years worked for many different ranches including: Jimmy passed away on March 19th, , in his home in Armstrong BC, at age Dude was also a working cowboy and cattle rancher.

He and his brother, Art, carved a pioneer ranch out of the wilderness west of Quesnel. Raised on a ranch in Alberta, Dude and Art came to BC to pursue their dreams, build their ranch and raise their families in the Cariboo.

Dude's books captured a splendid and little known piece of our western heritage. Few know cattle like Slim Dorin. Cowboy, rodeo competitor, and Cow Boss to Order Buyer.

He was born in the Wetaskiwin area of Alberta in At the age of 14 he had his own bundle team on a threshing crew. He competed in calf roping, saddle bronc, steer wrestling, and team roping before he took the job as Cow Boss at Douglas Lake Ranch. Slim did lots to help rodeos such as Merritt, Cloverdale, and Williams Lake, achieve their professional status. He has been honored several times for the contributions of his time and talent to rodeo, and in turn the cattle industry of BC.

Slim passed away in May, ! At Rockyford, near Strathmore, Alberta they, with their head of Herefords, purchased the "Dam Ranch" with cattle on it. After about 15 years they moved northeast to establish the "KM" near Morwayne, Alberta. It took 88 railcars to move the head of cattle, horses, cowboys, and family. Later when cattle prices started to look better, he went to calf crop sharing with the Frolek Ranch and for about 10 years looked after two to three hundred head.

His wife Mary passed away in and Roy moved from Pinantan and started cowboying for other people. He remarried and did some travelling but always returned to animals of some sort and finally hung up his saddle for good at the age of about 80!

At five foot one inch, Helen Schneider Kerr has been called "one of the best" by some of Canada's finest cowboys! She can spot a good looking animal in any herd and she has the rare ability to detect the slightest sign of sickness when riding the range. She can also doctor the animals with a knowledge that comes from a lifetime of experience riding on the range! Helen was born on her parent's ranch at Upper Hat Creek.

She married Alvin Kerr in Helen is respected by all who have had the privilege of knowing her! Mike Ferguson worked as the cowboss at Douglas Lake Ranch for 38 years!

Born in Kamloops in , Mike's knowledge of cattle came naturally. Mike started working cattle at the age of nine when he worked summers for his Uncle Harry Ferguson. His first cowboss was Slim Doran see Hall of Fame. In he started as cowboss.

Mike was known as a leader, a keen judge of an animal's health, weight and finish, and had an amazing ability to sort cattle with concise uniformity! He was also a hard man to get to know as he was loner. He began his rodeo career at the age of 13 and hit the height of his rodeo fame in the 's. In he was the Cariboo saddle bronc champion, and in was the saddle bronc champion of BC!

As well as being known in places like Cheyenne, Pendleton, Denver, and New York some of the worlds best rodeos , he was also known as a top horse breaker and trainer. Herb rode for both Douglas Lake Ranch and the Gang Ranch and was known as "quite a horseman and a good cowboy".

He passed away in Veera Witte Bonner , with the help of her two sisters, took on the enormous task of compiling the history of the Chilcotin and putting it into a book - "Chilcotin: Veera was inspired by the desire to record the history of her Grandfather, Tom Hance.

He was the first permanent, independent fur trader to settle among the Chilcotin Indians. Cecil Chase represents one of the finest examples of the living pioneer spirit in the province of BC. Born in Chase on April 1st, , Cecil began developing a life long commitment to the pioneer and cowboy spirit.

The village of Chase was named after his Grandfather, Whitfield, who purchased the land from the crown. In the 's Cecil got a name as a tamer of wild horses. He was known to spend every weekend chasing these wild horses.

He worked as a logger, mill worker, and cowboy all of his working life. During the 70's and 80's Cecil ran cattle on his leased property located on Neskonlith Lake, near Chase.

William Twan's skill with horses and cattle was known throughout the Cariboo. One of 12 children, Bill was born at Alexandria on Dec 8th At the age of 13 Bill stopped school and went to work, spending most of his life at Alkali Lake ranch.

He worked as both manager and cow boss and his ability to train horses was obvious in the cutting work shown by the horses that he rode day to day. He also raced horses and competed in roping, riding, Roman racing, and chariot racing. In the late 's and early 's he always cleaned up in the Stake and Roman races. He always said "You are no kind of cowboy at all if you ever look after yourself before your horse at the end of the day.

Leonard Palmantier became known as one of the best bareback-bronc riders that ever climbed on a horse during the early years of the Williams Lake stampede. He won and re-won the title of bareback-bronc champion of the Cariboo.

In the early 's it is said that after winning a championship he made an exhibition ride on one of the meanest bucking horses at the Stampede.

This ride was different - Leonard rode facing backwards! He spurred the whole time and stayed with her not only 'til the whistle blew but until she was too tired to buck any more! Leonard settled in the Cariboo in To raise some extra cash he would ride bucking horses to entertain the train passengers at Williams Lake - This was the beginning of the Williams Lake stampede! At nearly 75 he died Oct 24th, Shirley Field decided at a young age that there would be no wasted time in becoming an "important cowgirl"!

When she was nine she listened to Jimmy Rogers at the neighbours and said "I'm gonna be a yodeller! Since Shirley has recorded eight tapes and three CD's. Shirley never retired and has been at it for 55 years! We are happy to have Shirley perform again this year !

Frederick Nichol was born in At the age of 14 he left school to start ranching full time. He married Violet in A 35 year relationship with Bob Cahilty was started when Fred was asked if he would go to Monte Creek and break horses for the Bostock Ranch. In Fred began to show his own cattle and also started the Pinantan 4-H club.

He spent many years as a 4-H leader. Fred retired in and died in He is remembered as "a man of great humour and a wonderful story-teller Dick and his brothers and sisters grew up on a family ranch west of Fort St. John where he and his wife Irene stayed and raised 4 children. At the age of 12 Dick was doing field work with 4 horse teams and at 13 he graduated to 6 horses 2 broke and 4 unbroke! The ranch has now expanded to aprox.

Dick, with 2 friends, brought rodeo to Hudson Hope in where the Double H Saddle Club was developed and still runs the rodeo. At the age of 74 he still works the chutes and flags at the rodeo. He still manages the ranch and cowboys!

He was a director of the BC Cattlemen's Assoc. He also continues to be active in the North Peace Cattlemen's Assoc. He always has and still is very community minded introducing and assisting anyone interested in ranch life and is a strong supporter of the BC High School Rodeo!

June Charlton "From cradle to cowboy to champion. She is the youngest of 6 children. When she was a baby her Dad used to put her on a pillow in front of the saddle. She learned lots from her Dad who one time watched her get bucked off and told her to get back on and don't dare grab the saddle horn this time.

Sure enough the horse tryed to buck her off again but she stayed with him. Her Dad owned a ranch in Deadman Creek.

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From here the road climbs steadily for about 5 kilometres to White Lake. Half way up I suggested we stop for a short hike into a Western Screech-Owl nest box even though I knew it was very unlikely to see either of the owls. By now the skies looked seriously threatening, and the darkness was probably deepened by the partial solar eclipse that was going on behind the clouds.

We stopped at the St. Doreen offered to refill our empty water bottles and invited us in to watch the hummingbird feeders from the warmth of her kitchen. There, the Black-chinned Hummingbird male appeared within seconds, so after a short rest we got back on the bikes for the final leg of the trip. A light drizzle had begun to fall, but home was only 20 kilometres away. Although the comforts of home were calling loudly, I convinced the others that a check of Okanagan Lake would be worthwhile.

The rain continued to fall, the beach was busier with people than it had been at 7 a. As we struggled past the sternwheeler S. Sicamous I saw something white on the dark water, so stopped for a look—a Western Grebe!

We only had one more hill to climb—the West Bench hill, and it seemed to be the easiest hill of the day. The house was filled with birders and chatter about the day; I enjoyed a beer and a plate of curry, then climbed into bed. I woke at 6: After adding three species to my list, then deleting one of the double-counted Western Kingbirds, I came up with a figure of species for the day. A very respectable total, and coincidentally close to our distance travelled—just shy of kilometres.

The Green Team award for best non-motorized transport day was a very close affair—but after several judicial recounts the Vireos were declared winners over the Chafing for Chickadees— to A great day, great fun, and thousands of dollars raised for the Vaseux Lake Bird Observatory— you can follow our fund-raising totals and donate yourself if you like by clicking here , then clicking on one of names of the team members. With my bicycle Birdathon only a week away, I decided to give the route and equipment a bit of a dry run on Sunday.

I spent some time on Saturday getting the bike ready, installing a new odometer and adjusting the brakes. Now, the combination of bike maintenance and me are a fine example of why a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but after messing around with various screws, I thought I had everything set.

So I decided to leave at a reasonable hour in the morning and get the big climb to Kaleden and on to White Lake out of the way before things got toasty. I started up the hill at 9: Things were looking good. As a pedalled through the open woodlands to White Lake, my front brakes began giving me grief, rubbing so that I had to pedal harder than necessary. I fiddled with the adjustments again, but nothing seemed to solve the problem completely.

When I got to White Lake I put that out of my mind and got back into serious birding. This was sparrow country and I had a couple of targets. I ditched my bike at the big corner and walked up the hill to the south to search the grasslands for Grasshopper Sparrows.

A warm south wind had kicked up, making it difficult to listen for this species insect-like song, and it was obvious that most of the grassland birds had quit singing in late morning sun. I took a long loop walk through the sagebrush, hoping to kick up a Gray Partridge, but all I saw were singing Vesper Sparrows, migrant Savannah Sparrows and the ever-present Western Meadowlarks.

Back at the road, I got on the bike and cycled to the south end of the basin. I saw two spots on the road far ahead, and as I got closer I realized they were birds—that flushed off at my approach, showing their chestnut tail corners.

All that walking for nothing, except for the joy of meadowlark song in a sea of spring gold blooms. Western and Mountain Bluebirds perched above their nest-boxes; I peaked in one unattended box and saw five sky-blue eggs of uncertain bluebird parentage. I found a lone juniper and decided it would be a good place for a short siesta. I stretched out in its shade, checking its inner branches for a roosting owl—junipers in grassland here are magnets for Long-eared and other species.

There was indeed whitewash on some of the branches and a single downy feather, but no owl today. Marg drove by at about 3 p. A tire change is never a fun experience, especially late in the day on a hot, shadeless road.

The next morning, feeling refreshed and ready to tackle the bicycle situation again, I fixed the tire and the front brakes the brake solution was embarrassingly simple. I found that Russell had arrived home in our absence and was off birding with Jess Findlay, a keen young birder and wonderful photographer. I took my bike into the local shop for a professional tune-up, and when I got back Russell phoned from the Penticton Yacht Club, breathlessly saying that he was sure that he and Jess had found a Sedge Wren.

Now, Sedge Wrens are essentially unknown in British Columbia—there are only a couple of previous records. I jumped back in the car and raced down to the spot and over the next hour or so we saw the bird a few times at very close range but very briefly each time and heard it call several times.

Not exactly crippling views, but enough to say with confidence that this was a Sedge Wren. This morning I woke up at 5 a. After a couple of kilometres at walking speed it eventually loosened to the point where it could propel the bike fairly well, but it was very embarrassing to squeak by the early morning joggers. I arrived at the Yacht Club before anyone else, so walked along the trail towards the beach, then got out my coffee thermos and breakfast bagel.

Just as I poured the coffee, I heard loud shorebird calls from the beach. I ran down and there were three American Avocets swimming away from a crow on the beach!

As a bonus, a pair of Blue-winged Teal swam next to them—both species new for the year and the avocets a very special treat here.

Excited, but annoyed that I was at the top of a long hill, I turned the bike around and sailed down to the river in record time. I quickly found Russell, and after a few anxious minutes of searching, I found the bird, a nice female Black-throated Gray Warbler.

The committee considered the status of 35 wildlife species, including five birds. This small seabird breeds in old-growth forests along the coast of British Columbia. Other threats to Marbled Murrelets include fisheries bycatch, oil spills along existing and proposed shipping routes, and water temperature changes.

Two subspecies of this owl are found in Canada: Megascops kennicottii kennicottii along the British Columbia coast, and M. In , COSEWIC assessed the coastal subspecies as Special Concern—based on recent population declines—and the interior subspecies as Endangered, based on a very small population and habitat threats.

The situation along the central and northern coast is less clear, but considering studies in Alaska it is likely that populations have declined throughout the coast.

On an encouraging note, M. There are now thought to be to Western Screech-Owls in the interior. Canada supports about three-quarters of the world population of this shorebird.

It was thought to be nearing extinction in the s because of unregulated market hunting. Although its numbers have grown somewhat since hunting was banned, they remain very low compared with numbers in the s. There is renewed concern for the Buff-breasted Sandpiper, since the population is now thought to be declining again, but the species is difficult to monitor on both its Arctic breeding grounds and South American wintering grounds. It uses grassland habitats during migration and in the winter, and most birds in these habitats are showing significant population declines.

This songbird was assessed as Threatened in and again in However, the population has increased significantly in Canada and throughout the core of its breeding range in the United States.

This assessment was largely based on i ntensive research on this species by Bird Studies Canada biologists. When I was in high school the kid next door was not the type I thought would ever look at birds. He raced around the native grasslands south of our house in his home-made dune buggy, making a lot of noise and undoubtedly doing the delicate bunchgrass habitat no good.

But one day in the spring of he mentioned a little owl he saw while on his dune buggy adventures—an owl that dove down a hole when he roared by. Surprised and somewhat chagrined by not finding the owl before our neighbour, we nevertheless began regular watches and soon realized there were two owls at the burrow—a nesting pair!

In the middle of June, five young owls appeared at the burrow entrance; four weeks later they were making short flights. We last saw them at the burrow on October 1 st. This was the last natural nest of Burrowing Owls found in the British Columbia interior. The next year no owls returned to the burrow, and in a single owl stayed for a week or two in May before disappearing. Burrowing Owls were once common in the dry grasslands of the southern Interior of British Columbia, but their numbers declined rapidly when Europeans arrived in the area in the latter half of the s.

Venables of Vernon wrote: At first the program seemed successful, as birds migrated south in the fall and some returned in the spring, but when the active releases stopped in the numbers of breeding birds dropped quickly, and the last bird was seen in I now carry a picture of Jack in my backpack, which I took out at Lake Aloha so Jack could share the view. I kept wondering if Jack knew how much he is missed by his friends and family.

He informed me that Jack passed away during surgery. That and there were multiple deer wandering around my campsite making me constantly have to inspect whether it was deer or a bear.

It is with a heavy heart that I write this update. He plans to hike to South Lake Tahoe as soon as he can. I finally started hiking at nearly 8: Morning Light My hike was fun, with a mixture of snow, rock, and mud.

The trail had good views looking back at the Sierra. Sierra I walked by myself singing along to music and did short standing glissades on the snow where the lack of sun-cupping made it possible. Parts of the trail were covered in snow so I just opted for a direct line down a snow gully. I really wanted to get to town. Mostly I was looking forward to my first shower in nine days. She and I hitchhiked together and after almost an hour we finally got a ride into Kennedy Meadows North.

Mark picked us up with a van full of kids. He was an absolute sweetheart and even drove us a mile down a side road which was out of his way, just to bring us to the front door. He also gave us a Coke and a fresh baked brownie on our drive!

When we pulled up, I saw Ziploc walking out. Kennedy Meadows North is way better that the similarly named shithole to the south. In the late 's and early 's he always cleaned up in the Stake and Roman races. He always said "You are no kind of cowboy at all if you ever look after yourself before your horse at the end of the day.

Leonard Palmantier became known as one of the best bareback-bronc riders that ever climbed on a horse during the early years of the Williams Lake stampede.

He won and re-won the title of bareback-bronc champion of the Cariboo. In the early 's it is said that after winning a championship he made an exhibition ride on one of the meanest bucking horses at the Stampede.

This ride was different - Leonard rode facing backwards! He spurred the whole time and stayed with her not only 'til the whistle blew but until she was too tired to buck any more! Leonard settled in the Cariboo in To raise some extra cash he would ride bucking horses to entertain the train passengers at Williams Lake - This was the beginning of the Williams Lake stampede!

At nearly 75 he died Oct 24th, Shirley Field decided at a young age that there would be no wasted time in becoming an "important cowgirl"! When she was nine she listened to Jimmy Rogers at the neighbours and said "I'm gonna be a yodeller!

Since Shirley has recorded eight tapes and three CD's. Shirley never retired and has been at it for 55 years! We are happy to have Shirley perform again this year ! Frederick Nichol was born in At the age of 14 he left school to start ranching full time. He married Violet in A 35 year relationship with Bob Cahilty was started when Fred was asked if he would go to Monte Creek and break horses for the Bostock Ranch. In Fred began to show his own cattle and also started the Pinantan 4-H club.

He spent many years as a 4-H leader. Fred retired in and died in He is remembered as "a man of great humour and a wonderful story-teller Dick and his brothers and sisters grew up on a family ranch west of Fort St. John where he and his wife Irene stayed and raised 4 children. At the age of 12 Dick was doing field work with 4 horse teams and at 13 he graduated to 6 horses 2 broke and 4 unbroke!

The ranch has now expanded to aprox. Dick, with 2 friends, brought rodeo to Hudson Hope in where the Double H Saddle Club was developed and still runs the rodeo. At the age of 74 he still works the chutes and flags at the rodeo. He still manages the ranch and cowboys! He was a director of the BC Cattlemen's Assoc. He also continues to be active in the North Peace Cattlemen's Assoc.

He always has and still is very community minded introducing and assisting anyone interested in ranch life and is a strong supporter of the BC High School Rodeo! June Charlton "From cradle to cowboy to champion. She is the youngest of 6 children. When she was a baby her Dad used to put her on a pillow in front of the saddle. She learned lots from her Dad who one time watched her get bucked off and told her to get back on and don't dare grab the saddle horn this time.

Sure enough the horse tryed to buck her off again but she stayed with him. Her Dad owned a ranch in Deadman Creek.

She went to school in Savona until they built a school in Deadman. At the age of 8 she was driving their big Clyde mare pulling hay onto the stack. June and her sister Rita were the first two women in BC to hold a big game guide license. She rode with Herb Matier chasing wild horses on Tobacco Mountain. When her Dad sold his cattle June bought some of her own and registered her own brand. In she married Bill Charlton.

They raised two boys. At the age of 50 she joined a riding club and started to get involved in Gymkana and showing the young girls how a cowgirl could ride!

Over 60 years ago Bud McKague was born in Porcupine Plains, Sask, where he learned poetry from his parents who recited poetry as family entertainment. Throughout his life as a wild horse catcher, rough string rider at Douglas Lake Ranch , rodeo cowboy from Williams Lake to Florida , cattle rancher, Thoroughbred Horse racer, and more recently master poet, Bud's passion for the rhymer's art has never waivered. His ability to recall hours of classics as well as his own original poems has entertained and astounded countless audiences.

His generosity in passing along poems in the truest sense of the oral traditions to the younger generations, further exemplifies his love of poetry.

Bud has published a book, a tape and a CD. Bud was the real deal!! Bud passed away on June 16th, Robert P Bob Jesson still training young horses at 86 years old in photo. Born December 24, in Lougheed Alberta.

Bob is a great natural athlete and excelled in boxing in his youth! He is respected as one of the best horsemen in BC. In he started cowboying for the Gang Ranch and by he had established a solid reputation as a horse trainer and broke many horses for the Gang Ranch as well as other ranches in the Cariboo and Chilcotin.

From he cowboyed for Tranquille Stock Association. Bob was equally at home in a Western or English saddle and trained a long list of winning horses in many different fields of competition. Gus Gottfriedson was born August 21, At a young age he had the expertise of an exceptional horseman. His 'horse sense' was vast knowledge that brought him to the rodeo arenas where he excelled as a cowboy, stock contractor and rancher.

His success in these areas brought him to many communities where he captured the heart of the rodeo world. At one time Gus owned as many as horses! He supplied rodeo stock for every level of rodeo, from Little Britches to Professional! Gus, with his father-in-law, owned a stock contracting company which Gus passed on to his son in He retired from bronc riding in Its great to see some of his grandsons still carry on the rodeo tradition!

His family moved to BC while Kinik was still an infant and he spent the rest of his life here, mainly in the South Cariboo area. He worked for a lot of recognized ranchers over the years and finally bought his own place in and in he went to work as the Provincial Brand Inspector. He liked this job and stayed on untill He retired from his job but kept on riding for different ranches and for pleasure.

He didn't give up riding until ! During all his years as a cowboy he always seemed to have a guitar at hand and played in a band somewhere! He was well known for stories, his horsemanship, and his musical ability which was always in demand!

Kinik passed away July 25th, Eddie Bambrick was born at Big Creek on November 12th, He became cowboss at Alkali Lake Ranch at the age of 21! His next job was ranch foreman at the Gang Ranch where he supervised numerous cowboys and approximately head of cattle.

In Eddie went to Chilco Ranch where he worked for 10 years and finally retired at the age of Eddie also excelled in the rodeo world. He rode saddle bronc and took money and trophies, not only from his home town of Williams Lake but from numerous rodeos, from Prince Rupert to Vancouver. In he won the dangerous "Mountain Race" in 2 minutes and 27 seconds! Eddie died in Williams Lake, November 10th, at the age of Mike Isnardy was born at Chimney Creek in He was interested in horses from the time he was very young and was known as a horseman at an early age.

He worked at a number of different ranches breaking horses. In he bought Springhouse Ranch and ran some head of cattle and horses.

In he started his own little rodeo which lead to contracting stock to other rodeos all over the Cariboo. In he was one of the founding fathers of the Interior Amature Rodeo Association. He rode pickup, hazed for bulldoggers, and supplied stock from to In he sold his stock to Gus Gottfriedson see below.

He rode pickup for Gus until It was that year that Mike was feeding from the back of a pickup truck when a bale string broke and Mike fell to the ground, breaking a vertebra and ending up in a wheel chair. Kenny McLean entered his first rodeo in at the age of In and he won two more Canadian Bronc Riding Titles. During his bronc riding days he decided that he wanted to develop a couple of other rodeo skills - calf roping and steer wrestling.

He became the Canadian Champion in both these events - one of only two cowboys to do so! Kenny was Canadian All Around Champion through and again in He also won the high point award in and and still holds the Canadian record for the most major championships - 14!

Kenny still trained horses and competed in calf roping and team roping and always offered advice and encouragement to young competitors right up until he left us on July 13th, !

He remembers riding his horse to school every day. At 13 he learned to shoe horses and at 16 he sent away for a Professor Berry Course on how to train horses. One of the highlights of Dick's life were the Fall cattle drives to Savona. He would compete in the local rodeos - his favorite events being the calf roping and the wild cow milking.

His next job was as foreman on the Walhachin Ranch where they used to drive head to summer range at X-J Cow Camp a 4 day trip. Dick then took on the job as beef herdsman for the Government, at Tranquille Farm. After 14 years he and his wife, Eunice, retired to Mile Ranch and took up team penning. Andy Manuel - Andy was raised around horses and rode from a very early age.

His father was killed in a tumble while chasing horses. Andy was a top hand both on the range and in the arena. He competed in the very first Calgary Stampede, as well as other rodeos all over the west. Later in life Andy started raising horses for packing, and duding, as well as supplying rodeos with bucking stock. He would farm his ranch and his neighbour's ranches using his own teams. He would drive all the bucking stock to the rodeos, some as far away as Vancouver.

This was done over the original Coquihalla Trail. Some say it would take him 3 weeks to reach Vancouver but three months to return home.

The first professional Falkland Stampede used the bucking horses that Andy drove from Kamloops through Chase and over to Falkland. There is even a lake, Andy Lake, behind Mount Lolo, that was named after him.

Pike Anderson was born in Vernon in In his early years he trapped, hunted and ranched. He had an eye for cattle and knew the traits of every one he owned. He also did everything at the rodeos except ride bulls and saddle broncs. He also rode pickup for a stock contractor.

Pike had an eye for horses and bought and sold an uncountable number. He also loved helping young people get started in rodeo and was the guy that everyone wanted when it came to problem solving. Pike was one of the first members of the CPRA and one of the first to get a gold card and a lifetime membership.

A few years ago he had an accident when his horse tumbled and rolled on him - that has slowed him down a little but he still remains the same old "Pike" - a real western character! Thomas Alexander Bulman was a rancher and historian that was born in the Kamloops area in His book "Kamloops Cattlemen" was published in The book tells the story of Alex's own family, as well as the contributions made to the growth and prosperity of the ranching industry by many other cattlemen, cowboys and ranch hands in the Kamloops area!

Alex cowboyed for his Dad moving cattle from ranch to ranch from the time he was 10 years old. He married Nora Govett in Alex and his brother, Joe, inherited some large debts but after selling off some of their properties was still able to run around head. In the two brothers went their seperate ways. Alex kept the Willow Ranch. In he sold all but acres and downsized to head. He semi-retired in and sold the ranch. The following year he took on the job as fieldman for the BC Livestock Coop.

In Alex got back into ranching by purchasing acres next to his old ranch as well as buying back the Hudson Bay Meadow that he used to own. Eventually they retired to the Lower Mainland to be with their daughter and her family.

After many trips back to the ranch Alex finally sold. Joe Elkins was born in Nemiah Valley in or ' In he married Matilda Long Johnny and they raised a family of 15 children! He had a small herd of good cattle and numerous, quality horses.

He put up tons of hay and wintered stock for other ranches. For a few years in the 30's he was Ranch Manager for the Anaham Reserve. He loved rodeo and entered most events whenever he could. He didn't always make it to The Stampede because the trip would take 3 or 4 days by team and wagon but he did win the bronc riding in and again in He once rode a steer out of the shut backwards to show that he could do it and at age 60 his name went into the legend book for riding the meanest horse there at the Stampede.

Whatever Joe did - he did well! He always managed to provide for his family, even in the toughest of times. Joe passed away in Quesnel in Pat and Charlie Baker were married in and worked together to raise a family and build up a ranch!

Pat helped riding and haying until the children were born then tended a garden, cooked for the ranch help and family, and taught their kids by correspondence. They were one of the first to bring Charlais Cattle to the area where they ran cows and yearlings. Charlie was born in Ashcroft in and lived at Loon Lake until He took over the ranch in when his father passed away. Pat Drew was born in a nursing home in Kamloops in Not only did she ranch along side of Charlie but also found time to paint and do some taxidermy work.

In they sold the ranch but stayed on to run it for five more years. In they retired to a small place on the Mound Road. In they bought their first Paint Stallion and raised Paint Horses. They purchased an additional acres close by for hay and pasture and ran a cow herd until Charlie's death in May, RM Red Allison has a deep rooted history of the pioneer cowboy and ranching industry.

Red was born in Kamloops in and spent all of his childhood years around what is now known as Tranquille and North Kamloops. On leaving school Red worked for the Harper Ranch, 57 Mile Ranch, and spent a short stint in the army. In the 's he managed the OK Cattle Co and since then, for the last 20 years, he has been a bonded livestock dealer. Red has always promoted the cowboy way of life and was instrumental in starting 4H in the Chilcotin area.

You can always find him around the arena watching, helping, and giving tips to young up-and-coming cowboys. Red served as president of the Clinton Cattlemen's and director to the BC Cattlemen's for many years.

Rodeo has always been a big part of Red's life. He started as a young man entering events such as saddle bronc, bareback, team roping, calf roping, pony express, wild horse race and wild cow milking. If he wasn't entered you could find him behind the chutes or in the arena picking up bronc riders.

The name Red Allison is known and respected across the province of BC. He shares many stories of the old times with his family and friends. It always seems like he has a new one that we haven't heard. Red is a man that requires only good food, a good horse, a good dog, and his family around him to shine. He is a true depiction of the words "working cowboy. In September of the same year, his family traveled by train to Ashcroft, BC, and then by wagon to the North Bonaparte area.

The family settled on a small parcel of land and began raising cattle. This was the beginning of George's life as one of BC's outstanding cowboys. From then on his upbringing, way of life, and his employment, all involved ranching and cowboying in BC.

In the family relocated to Kamloops and in they purchased the Indian Gardens Ranch,. George worked on the ranch cowboying and haying while still in school and in ranching and cowboying at Indian Gardens Ranch became his full time lifes work. He was also known for his ability to break and train horses. George has been responsible for the early agricultural education of many of today' s ranchers, teaching not only the basics of ranching and cowboying, but also the appreciation and protection of nature.

The fact that he instilled his love of ranching and cowboying to his family shows, as there are now fourth generation members of the family who continue to carry on his life's work. To George, life was his horse, his dog, and himself riding alone out on the range.

It is obvious George had a great admiration and pride for his chosen life's work as a cowboy, rancher, father, teacher, trainer, and community worker. George passed away on October 8th, Bud Sharpe was borne in near Battleford, Saskatchewan. From the age of 10 he owned his own horses and by 15 had nearly a dozen.

His first rodeo he started with the cow riding and bareback riding and after quite a while he switched to saddle broncs. He traveled to rodeos all through the US and Canada.

He turned from bronc riding to judging the bucking horses as a PRCA judge. Bud worked as a cowboy in Alberta for a year when he was 17 or 18 and in he worked as a cowboy for the Douglas Lake Ranch. The ranch had a lot of young colts to ride and Bud was sent out to the Springfield corral to break them. These corrals were a long way out and there was no one around so Bud and his partner flanked these colts and bucked them out.

I don't think management ever did hear about it. He'd sent to Eaton's for his leather. One year in the US, Bud ordered a tree because he needed a saddle for the next weekend. A friend owed him some money that bought him some leather and sheep skin - the saddle was ready in time! He has since sold it four times and bought it back four times.

Over the years Bud has made about saddles. One fellow in Pennsylvania ordered four saddles. Some of his saddles have been sent to Texas, Colorado, California, and as far away as Australia. Bud also makes a lot of chaps, panniers, saddle bags for horses and motorcycles, and rodeo gear, rigging, and spur straps - anything out of leather. Today rodeo is everywhere around Bud - in the saddle shop, in the horse corrals around the farm, and in their home.

Rodeo photos from Madison Square Gardens, the Los Angeles Coliseum, and graceful bucking horses, highlight Bud's impressive career as a rodeo contestant, judge, cowboy, and saddlemaker.

Delmer Jasper was born at Meldrum Creek in He was the youngest son of pioneers Wes and Mabel Jasper. Inheriting his love of ranching and rodeo from his father, who was one of the top ropers in the Williams Lake stampede, Delmer began riding with his Dad at the age of three. His first job was at Gang Ranch, where he helped train horses, at the age of His rodeo career lasted almost 50 years, beginning when he won the saddle bronc and calf roping at Anahim Lake when he was After his marriage in he focussed on.

Delmer also competed in gymkhanas where his specialty was the potato race. If he wasn't competing himself, he was somewhere behind the chutes helping to put on the show and after a full day of competing, or working, he carried on his volunteer work at the evening functions. He also played an important part in organizing stampedes including his annual hometown show at Riske Creek. Delmer was among those who established the Riske Creek Rodeo grounds in Delmer passed away in at the age of Delmer's children, and grandchildren, continue the Jasper tradition in rodeo and ranching.

Gil began riding broncs as a youngster and began his rodeo career when he was in his early teens, riding steers and bareback. As an adult he competed in most events, from bronc riding to the infamous mountain race. He topped the steer decorating and won the saddle bronc at the Williams Lake Stampede. In Chelan, Washington, in , Gil scored a 94 in saddle bronc - a score unchallenged anywhere in Canada or the US for many years. In he entered 6 main events at Burnaby Lake and won every one - plus the all-round buckle.

He was ranked in the top three in all of Canada for all-round cowboy. For seven years he rode on the pro circuit in saddle bronc, calf roping, bare back, bull riding, and steer wrestling. Gil has always been more than willing to help out at the drop of a hat. Gil also opperates his own leather and saddle shop - the "Rodeo Shop" where he hand builds saddles, producing as many as 20 saddles a year.

He has built many trophy saddles for the different rodeo associations of BC. Since Gil retired from rough stock he spends much of his time competing in team roping as a header or heeler and continues to host BCTRA events at his home arena in Red Rock.

Gillie spent years on the amateur and professional rodeo circuit as a competitor and a judge. Laverne was a rancher from his earliest years. The farm raised sheep, cattle and hay until when the sheep were sold. The cattle and hay are the mainstay today. As a young man his talents for breaking horses riding and work were much in demand throughout the valley. He learned the art of blacksmithing from local pioneer Alex Pringle and would often travel throughout the valley with Alex shoeing horses.

In the fall Laverne would harvest Christmas trees and haul them to the coast to sell. On one such trip, through mutual friends, he met Peggy Mullin.

Peggy was born September 13, in Saskatchewan and at a young age moved with her family to Abbotsford. Peggy earned her teachering certificate and was teaching physical education in Langley when she met Laverne.

Laverne and Peggy were married in June and moved to the home on the farm in Westwold, where they still reside.

Peggy adapted well to farm life, the large gardens, doing preserves for winter, and cooking for hired help. Together they raised three children and became actively involved in the community groups and events.

As their children grew older Laverne and Peggy became involved in their activities, one being the BC High School Rodeo Association where they both were honoured for their contributions see photo. To supplement the family income Peggy returned to teaching at Falkland and taught until retiring in Laverne continued to farm actively until the last few years when son Scott has taken over, although Laverne is still a very integral part of the day to day operations.

In the true sense of the words, ranching and pioneers, Laverne and Peggy always have a hot cup of coffee and a warm bed for visitors. Fredrick James Alexander Fred Long Whether it be brush-popping and choking dust on a cattle drive, climbing onto a colt in the breaking corral or driving a team in harness, Fred Long was equally at ease. He was a man with a lifelong passion for horses, cattle ranching and the western lifestyle, and he was proud to be a part of BC's cowboy heritage.

Fred was born on December 28, in Belfast, Ireland. During his teen years, he would steal horses from the gypsies and gallop wildly over the moors - returning his mounts before they were missed. Since this was not quite the cowboy life that he dreamed of, he immigrated to Canada in Next Fred hired on at Alkali Lake Ranch to break horses, and to cowboy.

He chased wild horses south of Alexis Creek, catching nine, by roping them one at a time. His next move was to Barriere where he set up his own training stable.

In , Fred went to England and joined the King's Troop of the Royal Horse Artillery, but the lure of the Canadian west called him back again and he returned to the Kamloops area. He managed a stud farm in Barnhartvale, where he also trained racehorses. In , Fred took a job as deputy brand inspector in Kamloops.

He moved to Williams Lake in to a full-time inspector's position until Fred bought the Mile Ranch in , then a ranch on Enterprise in Here they had a small bunch of cows, yearlings on grass, and of course, broke and trained horses - until recently when Fred's health slowed him down.

Over the years Fred has trained and successfully competed horses in western pleasure, reining, working cow horse, cutting, packing, jumping, racing, and driving! In his lifetime, Fred has ridden, driven or packed over 4, horses, of which he broke himself. During the late nineties Fred worked in the movie industry in BC and Alberta.

He immensely enjoyed reliving the horse and buggy days in western scenes created for the movies. Over the years he promoted BC's cowboy and ranching heritage by helping out at community activities such as 4H, school education sessions, and cattlemen association meetings. Fred "left this outfit" on October 24th, for that "spread in the sky.

Local teamsters supplied five additional teams and wagons to transport guests to and from the gravesite. Fred shall be missed and remembered. His life has been a journey - from hanging on to the western culture of the working cowboy to embracing better horses and horsemanship through competition. At the age of 12 he started to work at the Gang Ranch where he worked most of his life.

Although Charlie's life was horses and cowboying, he lived in Williams Lake for three years working for All Fir and Lignum sawmills. City life didn't appeal to Charlie so he returned to the Gang Ranch. He was given the job as head cowboy at Riske Creek, taking care of steers on the Riske Creek range with his home base at Harper Meadow.

Charlie was an excellent horse breaker. He always rode a good cow horse. He took good care of his horses and. He was always on hand to teach and help the younger cowboys to be top hands. He was well liked and respected by his many friends and co-workers. In his prime he was a competitor in bronc riding, the famous mountain race in Williams Lake, and also did a good job as a pickup man.

Charlie never learned to drive a car though it was known, that after a few drinks he gave it a fling, but when it came to driving a team there was none better.

Charlie left us July 30, He is buried in the Toosey Cemetery, in the heart of the country he always called home. Charlie will always be remembered for the good cowboy he was; there's few left like him. Gerry Bracewell was born at Halfway Lake, Alberta in She lived her early years on the bare back of a steer calf or horse. Her mother bought her a filly when she was eight, but she wasn't allowed a saddle until she was Gerry's life for 62 years has been in this valley, ranching and guiding.

Gerry married the son of K. Moore, the owner of the Circle X Ranch, and had two sons. She ran the ranch with her Grand Dad Moore during her husband's absence for the war, cowboying with her babies in front or behind of her - the packboxes carrying pillows, diapers and food. Grandpa kept the boys at the ranch while Gerry did the. Gerry remarried, to Alf Bracewell, in The reins of the family business have been handed over to son Alex and his wife. Gerry's life has been one of community involvement; being postmistress, census taker, and she is presently the President of the West Chilcotin Historical Society.

Gerry and Alf live on the ranch, putting up hay for the horses used at the lodge. Gerry busies herself with grandchildren, cowboy poetry writings, and is just this Fall hosting the CBC "On the Road Again" crew, as they pay tribute to her life.

Joe Rosette was a cowboy. It is all he ever did and all he ever knew in his lifetime. He was one of the best, but you would never hear it from him. Unassuming and modest and one of the most likeable individuals that you'd ever meet, Joe was born January 3rd, at Williams Meadow, Gang Ranch, BC. He never strayed far from his birthplace. Joe started work full time at the Gang Ranch as a year-old, first on the hay crew for a short time before joining the cowboy crew. After a time, Joe rose to the cowboss position working under the management of the Sidwell family, then working for the next Gang manager, Wayne Robinson.

He later moved his family to. Empire Valley Ranch, where he spent 9 years as a foreman under the manager at that time, Floyd Fellhauer. Gang Ranch was Joe's home and the pull of the place was strong enough for Joe to return there to work once again. Joe also worked for Mike Fairless - as cowboss and it was his last job on the Gang Ranch.

After a brief stint in Walhachin working on a hay ranch that the Sidwells had purchased Joe returned yet again to Empire Valley to work for Tom Hook. At Walhachin Joe was farther away from home than he had ever been for work.

This was the end of the cowboy road for Joe, he had unloaded his gear for the last time. He spent the next 17 years working under Bronc at Alkali.

It was a very unusual thing to see this fine man in a "bad" mood; he always had a smile, a joke or a kind word. He liked children immensely and was always ready to teach an interested person a thing or two about his profession. Joe was also a rodeo cowboy, competing at local rodeos as a team roper. He had friends everywhere, and from every walk of life. There never was a cowboy with whom he worked, that did not respect his abilities.

If you ask anyone whom ever knew and worked with this man, the respect and admiration for his ability was unwavering and unilateral. Joe's lifetime was cut short when he passed away suddenly, August 31st, , at the young age of 62, at home, at Alkali Lake Ranch - he was still cowboying daily.

Danny Lytton Born in Sheridan, Wyoming in to a pioneer family and raised on a ranch on Powder River, Dan moved with his family to a ranch in Flathead Valley of Western Montana when he was 8 years old. Dan spent a lot of time there before moving to Loon Lake Ranch in working with Charlie Baker breaking horses, working cattle, and rodeoing. Dan placed in the top ten for just about 30 years before an accident at the finals in Princeton He was a Canadian Team Roping Assn.

He also received roping and penning overall High Point Bronze in Between ranching at Sheridan Lake, breaking horses, trucking hay and livestock all over the province, shoeing a pile of horses individual's and guest ranches' in Mile House area, he raised four children to be good riders and ropers. They learned to appreciate the lifestyle of rodeo, the good horses you ride, and all the good friends you make along the way.

Dan put on many a mile with partners, and later with kids, always optimistic and ready for a good contest.

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