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Not long after Nelly Spigner arrived at the University of Richmond in as a Division I soccer player and aspiring surgeon, college began to feel like a pressure cooker. Overwhelmed by her busy soccer schedule and heavy course load, she found herself fixating on how each grade would bring her closer to medical school. But she began to experience intense mood swings. At times, she found herself crying uncontrollably, unable to leave her room, only to feel normal again in 30 minutes.

She started skipping classes and meals, avoiding friends and professors, and holing up in her dorm. In the spring of her freshman year, she saw a psychiatrist on campus, who diagnosed her with bipolar disorder, and her symptoms worsened.

In October of her sophomore year, she withdrew from school on medical leave, feeling defeated. Spigner is one of a rapidly growing number of college students seeking mental health treatment on campuses facing an unprecedented demand for counseling services. Students seeking help are increasingly likely to have attempted suicide or engaged in self-harm, the center found. To prevent students from burning out and dropping out, colleges across the country — where health centers might once have left meaningful care to outside providers — are experimenting with new measures.

For the first time last fall, UCLA offered all incoming students a free online screening for depression. More than 2, students have opted in, and counselors have followed up with more than who were identified as being at risk for severe depression, exhibiting manic behavior or having suicidal thoughts.

Virginia Tech University has opened several satellite counseling clinics to reach students where they already spend time, stationing one above a local Starbucks and embedding others in the athletic department and graduate student center. Ohio State University added a dozen mental health clinicians during the academic year and has also launched a counseling mobile app that allows students to make an appointment, access breathing exercises, listen to a playlist designed to cheer them up, and contact the clinic in case of an emergency.

And student government leaders at several schools have enacted new student fees that direct more funding to counseling centers. But most counseling centers are working with limited resources. The average university has one professional counselor for every 1, students — fewer than the minimum of one therapist for every 1, to 1, students recommended by the International Association of Counseling Services.

As colleges try to meet the growing demand, some students are slipping through the cracks due to long waits for treatment and a lasting stigma associated with mental health issues. Even if students ask for and receive help, not all cases can be treated on campus. But especially in rural areas, where options for off-campus care are limited, universities are feeling pressure to do more.

The average age of onset for many mental health issues, including depression and bipolar disorder, is the early 20s.

Dana Hashmonay was a freshman at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York in when she began having anxiety attacks before every class and crew practice, focusing on uncertainties about the future and comparing herself to seemingly well-adjusted classmates. When she tried to make an appointment with the counseling center, she was put on a two-week waitlist.

Instead, she started meeting weekly with an off-campus therapist, who her parents helped find and pay for. She later took a leave of absence midway through her sophomore year to get additional help. Hashmonay thinks the university could have done more, but she notes that the school seemed to be facing a lack of resources as more students sought help.

Some students delay seeing a counselor because they question whether their situation is serious enough to warrant it. Emmanuel Mennesson says he was initially too proud to get help when he started to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression after arriving at McGill University in Montreal in with plans to study engineering.

He became overwhelmed by the workload and felt lost in classes where he was one student out of hundreds, and began ignoring assignments and skipping classes. For many students, mental health struggles predated college , but are exacerbated by the pressures of college life. Albano says some of her patients assume their problems were specific to high school. Optimistic that they can leave their issues behind, they stop seeing a therapist or taking antidepressants.

Counselors point out that college students tend to have better access to mental health care than the average adult because counseling centers are close to where they live, and appointments are available at little to no cost.

But long-term treatment services, including recurring appointments and specialized counseling, decreased on average during that time period. In response to a growing demand for mental health help, some colleges have allocated more money for counseling programs and are experimenting with new ways of monitoring and treating students.

There is typically a weeklong wait for appointments, which can reach two weeks by mid-semester. The university has embedded two counselors in dorms since and is considering adding more after freshmen said it was a helpful service they would not have sought out on their own.

Schreier also added six questions about mental health to a freshman survey that the university sends out several weeks into the fall semester. He says early intervention is a priority because mental health is the number one reason why students take formal leave from the university. As colleges scramble to meet this demand, off-campus clinics are developing innovative, if expensive, treatment programs that offer a personalized support system and teach students to prioritize mental wellbeing in high-pressure academic settings.

Dozens of programs now specialize in preparing high school students for college and college students for adulthood, pairing mental health treatment with life skills classes — offering a hint at the treatments that could be used on campus in the future. She learned note-taking and time management skills in between classes on healthy cooking and fitness, as well as sessions of yoga and meditation. Mennesson, the former McGill engineering student, is now studying at Westchester Community College in New York with the goal of becoming a math teacher.

Another treatment model can be found at CUCARD in Manhattan, where patients in their teens and early 20s can slip on a virtual reality headset and come face-to-face with a variety of anxiety-inducing simulations — from a professor unwilling to budge on a deadline to a roommate who has littered their dorm room with stacks of empty pizza boxes and piles of dirty clothes.

Virtual reality takes the common treatment of exposure therapy a step further by allowing patients to interact with realistic situations and overcome their anxiety. But she withdrew after a few classes, deciding to get a job and focus on her health instead of forcing a return to school before she is ready.

Back at the University of Richmond for her senior year, Spigner says the attitude toward mental health on campus seems to have changed dramatically since she was a freshman. Back then, she knew no one else in therapy, but most of her friends now regularly visit the counseling center, which has boosted outreach efforts, started offering group therapy and mindfulness sessions, and moved into a more private space.

Spigner, who meets weekly with a counselor on campus, has become a resource to many of her friends because she openly discusses her own mental health, encouraging others not to be ashamed to get help. Dana Hashmonay, now 21, took a medical leave during her sophomore year of college after struggling with anxiety at school.

By Katie Reilly March 19, During her freshman year, Hashmonay sought out help on campus after she started having anxiety attacks before her classes and crew practices. This virtual reality program — developed by Headset Health in partnership with the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders — allows students to confront their anxiety in a simulated college scenario. Sign Up for Our Newsletters Sign up to receive the top stories you need to know now on politics, health, money and more.

The University of Tampa - Tampa, Florida - Non-Degree Seeking Students

Each student gets five free one-on-one sessions each semester, and drop-in tutoring is free for all students. Visit the study abroad website to find programs in your major, and visit the Study Abroad Fair on Wednesday, Sept. UT will start charging you after the fourth time. Try to make your own food in the morning so you can save your Dine In dollars and Bevo Bucks for lunch and dinner.

Be sure to check which on-campus dining places take Bevo Bucks and which take Dine In Dollars because your money can run out quickly. West campus is a prime location for student living, and people start signing leases for the following year as early as October. Party on the Plaza, an event where students promote their organizations, takes place Sept.

But Ruth, an assistant managing editor, had just lost the election for Texan editor. She was feeling a bit blue. Paul, already working at the American-Statesman as well as continuing his studies at The University and serving as a Texan assistant managing editor, suggested getting married immediately might help cheer her up.

No parents or blood relatives involved. It was to be a tiny affair, Ruth asked me, a senior and Amusements editor at the time, to be her maid of honor and Paul chose Don McKinney, an Amusements staffer and all-around wonderful guy anybody know where he is today?

Watson prepares to start the ceremony. Before he could begin, doors to the courtroom began to open and quietly, one after another, just about the entire Texan staff entered to join the celebration. Someone had put the wedding details on the assignments blackboard. There was a running gag on the Texan chalkboard using any reference or pun possible about Ben Day boxes. I copied them all during the semester and then submitted an essay about the strange, tribal communication. Easiest essay I ever wrote!

The SoRelles were swiftly married and we all decamped west to Lakeway where my parents had a house that I had offered to Ruth and Paul for their honeymoon. A delightful party ensued. I trust we left the couple alone before too long so they could get the marriage started properly. Ruth remembers awakening the next day to the sound of military maneuvers taking place in the area.

Today, this marriage-on-the-fly remains intact. And so do the friendships forged to the smell of hot lead so very long ago. One of my first assignments at The Daily Texan I think as part of the news writing class was to talk to visitors from a university in Czechoslovakia.

They were there for a conference, and their nation seemed to be opening up. However, the Soviets marched into Prague while they were still in Austin. Fearing for their families back home, they would not talk to me. I still remember my first night on the copy desk at the Texan probably January ?

I had spent the summer before working on my hometown newspaper, the Port Arthur News, and I had probably finished the first copyediting course at UT. Bob Hilburn was there, and Rick Scott was in the slot.

They started throwing copy around, and this guy walked in in a suit! A suit, of all things. He sat down and started editing copy. He and Rick traded stories about the stupidity of cattle and sheep, as I remember. It was a long night, and I went down to the makeup room later, using the stairs because that elevator scared me. I knew something about makeup because I had had to oversee the makeup of the television magazine in Port Arthur and because my high school had a vocational print shop attached.

They still had curfews then. I loved it — the give and take, the laughter, the dark humor. At one point, I became the day city editor, sending people out on assignment. The next fall, I was made a senior reporter. I learned to write color, and I found I loved to do that.

The Vietnam moratorium march was a long one that went on and on. I think I was assigned to gather color on that one. There was a lot of it. The voices resounded around the city: Paul sent me out to the Waller Creek Trees protest. I remember going up to Frank Erwin and telling him there was an injunction on the way to stop him.

He just told the bulldozers to go faster. The protesters were up in the trees, and I was in a mini-skirt. I remember, after the trees were down, the protesters picked them up and marched on the Tower. Rick Fish, then with the Austin American-Statesman was with me. He boosted me up over walls and blockades of trees. When I got back to the office, I told Paul how helpful Rick had been. Erwin tried to shut down the Chuck Wagon at the Student Center, saying it was a hotbed of drugs and prostitution.

I believed the drugs. Prostitution — probably not. I was inside the Chuck Wagon interviewing students who were occupying it when the DPS came in one door and we all ran out the other. They had a big flatbed truck they were going to haul us away in, but I think they went back mostly empty. Too young and stupid, I guess. We were at the Texan the night they gave students their draft numbers. I remember how my heart fell. It seems someone born on Christmas Eve should have had better luck.

Somewhere in the middle of all this, Paul and I fell in love, and we fell hard. It was a heady time. We eloped April 10, , although it seems that most of The Texan staff came to the event.

Next April, it will be 44 years. We have two grown children and two aging cats. I could have graduated early, but I had a scholarship and Paul said we needed the money to live on, so I stayed in school and took all the courses I had thought I could not fit into my schedule.

What did The Daily Texan teach me? No one goes into daily journalism for delayed gratification. I learned to dig in and get the best daily story I could. I learned how to develop sources and work them — hard. I realized soon after graduation that I needed to specialize, unless I wanted to spend my life doing cops and courts. I learned to challenge authority, and I learned never to accept fully the explanations of those in authority — or those in opposition to it.

The truth usually rests somewhere in the middle. I learned never to walk out of an interview with questions unanswered. I was the medical writer at The Houston Chronicle for 20 years. It was a tough beat, and it got tougher as the Texas Medical Center got bigger, AIDS threatened to overtake us and the costs of health care spiraled out of control. What I learned at The Daily Texan was to dig in, evaluate the story in terms of the people for whom I was writing and never let an editor dictate my values.

I taught journalism at UH on adjunct basis once, and a student asked me how I knew when I had gone as far as I should. It was simple, I told her. I have to be able to look at myself in the mirror the next day. Yet I remember what is probably the most important thing in journalism: You are only an expert in telling the story.

When you begin to consider yourself an expert in the field about which you are writing, it is time to leave. The hardest lesson I learned came after journalism school, and I think it is one that we fail to teach young reporters. To be a reporter is to be on the outside looking in. Once you go through that door and become part of the story yourself, you are lost.

On April 13, , the Apollo 13 lunar landing mission, launched April 11, began to go seriously awry. The three-man crew James A. The situation is perilous, and the possibility of the three astronauts returning safely to earth is seriously in question. It has been several! Virginia Tech University has opened several satellite counseling clinics to reach students where they already spend time, stationing one above a local Starbucks and embedding others in the athletic department and graduate student center.

Ohio State University added a dozen mental health clinicians during the academic year and has also launched a counseling mobile app that allows students to make an appointment, access breathing exercises, listen to a playlist designed to cheer them up, and contact the clinic in case of an emergency.

And student government leaders at several schools have enacted new student fees that direct more funding to counseling centers. But most counseling centers are working with limited resources. The average university has one professional counselor for every 1, students — fewer than the minimum of one therapist for every 1, to 1, students recommended by the International Association of Counseling Services.

As colleges try to meet the growing demand, some students are slipping through the cracks due to long waits for treatment and a lasting stigma associated with mental health issues. Even if students ask for and receive help, not all cases can be treated on campus. But especially in rural areas, where options for off-campus care are limited, universities are feeling pressure to do more. The average age of onset for many mental health issues, including depression and bipolar disorder, is the early 20s.

Dana Hashmonay was a freshman at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York in when she began having anxiety attacks before every class and crew practice, focusing on uncertainties about the future and comparing herself to seemingly well-adjusted classmates.

When she tried to make an appointment with the counseling center, she was put on a two-week waitlist. Instead, she started meeting weekly with an off-campus therapist, who her parents helped find and pay for. She later took a leave of absence midway through her sophomore year to get additional help.

Hashmonay thinks the university could have done more, but she notes that the school seemed to be facing a lack of resources as more students sought help. Some students delay seeing a counselor because they question whether their situation is serious enough to warrant it. Emmanuel Mennesson says he was initially too proud to get help when he started to experience symptoms of anxiety and depression after arriving at McGill University in Montreal in with plans to study engineering.

He became overwhelmed by the workload and felt lost in classes where he was one student out of hundreds, and began ignoring assignments and skipping classes. For many students, mental health struggles predated college , but are exacerbated by the pressures of college life.

At these schools, students meet more than just close friends. "Everyone on campus is looking for their spouse. Upperclassmen are practically Visit Niche for more information on the University of Texas at Austin. 6/ Students who study abroad are up to % Opposite page, clockwise from top left: So alumni and friends: the chance to double their investment in the arts at UT. to provide a coordinated structure and one-stop shop for students seeking to. Rent rooms, apartments & houses near your college campus. Browse thousands of listings from campuses and major cities across the country. Search today!.