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(PDF) Being a female PE teacher in an all-boys' school

Sword swallowing was often seen at festivals throughout the ancient Roman empire. In the Popul Vuh , the Maya myths, there is mention of the two main Mayan heroes doing stilt-walking and sword-swallowing.

This suggests that the time of its transmission from oral to written history would have been about years ago. According to a June, article in Tops Magazine, an Independent Magazine of Magic entitled "Primitive Sword Swallowing" , a primitive tribe in Papua New Guinea uses a form of "vine-swallowing" in the initiation rites of teens being initiated into adulthood.

Chinnery told of a new native tribe found in New Guinea. In an initiation ceremony, added Mr. Chinnery, the men pushed lengths of flexible cane into their throats until the cane reached their stomachs. Then, reeds are forced up their nostrils and their tongues are stabbed until their blood has been sufficiently purified. There was a video documentary filmed in the s or 80s on this initiation rite of passage, showing many of the canes or vines being removed from the young men's throats covered in blood.

It was reported that several of the initiates die each year from the perforations. TopsMagazine article June Matausa cane swallowing. Swordswallowers are mentioned in AD during the Teutonic fight for Rome. The art and practice of sword swallowing traveled north from India into China around AD. Sword swallowing was popular in Japan in the 8th century and was often seen as part of an acrobatic form of entertainment known as Sangaku , which also featured juggling, tightrope walking, contortion, and other related skills.

This type of performance art was "street theater" and the performers traveled throughout Japan. Sangaku, like other forms of drama popular in Japan prior to the 11th century, traced its origins to southern China and India. Japanese engraving Japanese Sword Swallower.

Dervish is Persian for "beggar. Some are religious entertainers hired to chant the zikr dirge, and some only perform Dervish ceremonies on special occasions. Dervishes are known for working themselves into frenzies and committing great feats of strength this is where we get the term "Whirling Dervishes". One of the Dervish orders founded in was the order of Rifais who eat glass, walk on hot coals, and swallow swords. Ancient sword swallower from Hittite Period in Anatolia.

Sword swallowing spread north from Greece and Rome into Europe at the hands of medieval jongleurs and other street performers who performed in public areas. In the Middle Ages, sword swallowers, like magicians, jugglers and other entertainers, were often condemed and persecuted by the Catholic Church. Still, in most places they were popular by the common folk, and the tradition of the wandering entertainer remained strong.

By the midth century, performers wandered more freely and became common sights on street corners and at festivals across Europe. Sword swallowing began to die out in Europe and Scandinavia in the late s, when variety shows were formally outlawed in Sweden in Sword Swallower on display Croix, Sept 26 It was through the good offices of a sword-swallower that the Scotch physician, Dr.

Edward Stevens , was enabled to make his experiments on digestion in As part of his research, Dr. Stevens had a sword swallower swallow small metallic tubes pierced with holes. They were filled, according to Reaumer's method, with pieces of meat. After a certain length of time, he would have the sword swallower disgorge the tubes, and in this way he observed to what degree the process of digestion had taken place. It was also probably the sword-swallower who showed the physicians to what extent the pharynx could be habituated to contract, and from this resulted the invention of the tube of Faucher , the esophageal sound, lavage of the stomach, and illumination of this organ by electric light.

Stevens ' father, Thomas , a prosperous merchant, was reputedly also the father of Alexander Hamilton. Nothing is known of his mother. In his youth, Stevens moved with his family to New York.

It removed the confusion and contradictions presented in the doctrines of fermentation and trituration, the latter championed by Leeuwenhoek, Borelli, Pitcairn, and Pecquet, and decried by Astruc and Stephen Hales.

It also repudiated such views as those of John Pringle and David Macbride. Stevens confirmed this, isolated human gastric juice, and performed experiments both in vitro and in vivo in man and animals.

Stevens was admitted to the Royal Medical Society Edinburgh on 20 January , and served as its president in and At Edinburgh he was awarded the Harveian prize for an experimental inquiry on the red color of the blood. He returned to St. Croix about and practiced medicine there for ten years. In Stevens moved to Philadelphia. On 18 April he was admitted to the American Philosophical Society, and the following year he was appointed professor of the practice of medicine in King's College later Columbia University.

It is probable that Stevens ' presence and reputation in Philadelphia, as well as his contributions in gastric physiology, contributed to the marked interest in gastric studies that took place round the turn of the century in that city.

Of these studies, that of John R. He undoubtedly was familiar with Stevens ' work; indeed, his experiments with bullfrogs and small frogs are reminiscent of Stevens ' observations of partially digested small fish inside larger ones. Stevens was United States consul-general in Santo Domingo from to His consular dispatches to Timothy Pickering, Adams, Jefferson, and other leaders, revealing a critical, observant mind, outlined the geopolitical problems facing the United States in the Caribbean at that time.

Controversy marred his political life, however, and he returned to the United States in He made appearances at the American Philosophical Society meetings in and , probably returning to St. Little is known of Stevens ' last years. David Hosack wrote to him in St. Croix on yellow fever in , and in he wrote Hosack a letter introducing his son, who had also graduated at Edinburgh. Stevens ' fundamental and sound gastric studies were confirmed by Spallanzani, who augmented and added to them in masterly fashion, assuring that from then on, gastric physiology would be a well-founded science.

Sena Sama also spelled Senaa Samma from Madras. Tamil Nadu, India was reported to be the first known sword swallower in America. An article dated November 11, reports, "Senaa Samma appeared at St. John's Hall in New York City in a lovely exhibition of juggling and sword swallowing. The newspaper account said that he swallowed "a sword manufactured by Mr. William Pye of New York as a substitute for the one lately stolen from him by some villain.

Sama is mentioned in both " Annals of the American Circus, Vol. In , the book " Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society " mentions that sword swallower Sena Sama came to New York and swallowed a sword that measured 22 inches long.

Could this have been Ramo Samee or one of his troupe from Madras and London? Seeking pictures and more information. Ramo Samee probably " Ramaswamy " was a 19th century East Indian juggler and magician who starred with his own juggling troupe. In fact, he is considered to be the first "modern" professional juggler, and was by far the most famous juggler of his time.

Samee was born around in East India, possibly in Madras in Tamil Nadu, and was brought to England in at around the age of A certain Captain Campbell , returning to England from the Indian colony in , brought a troupe of Indian magicians and performers with him and installed them in Pall Mall Street London, where they demonstrated native juggling, acrobatics, yogic postures, conjuring, and sleight of hand for an audience that was curious about the quaint customs and strange manners of India.

Is it then a trifling power we see at work, or is it something next to miraculous? The inspiration for one of the Western world's fundamental puzzlers, the Needle Swallowing Trick , can probably be traced back to the genius of Ramo Samee. Samee was known for performing a trick he called "Stringing Beads With the Mouth", in which he "swallowed" a handful of beads and a string, then pulled the beads out of his mouth, one by one, tied to the string.

Samee 's troupe included Kia Khan Khruse , another Indian juggler-magician who first introduced the " Needle Swallowing Trick " to European audiences in Obviously, this was a more dangerous version of Samee 's bead swallowing trick. Samee first presented the Indian needle trick to Western audiences in the 's, where he would swallow a hundred needles. Samee performed in England from to , with successful tours of the eastern United States in , and again in An advertisement in the Salem Gazette of October 5, , describes the "East Indian" magician and juggler Ramo Samee as having performed "for some time past in the metropolis of England, and before all the crowned heads of Europe, who have unanimously pronounced him to be the first master of the art in their dominions.

Samee also performed on January 15, at the Royal Coburg Theatre. In , Frederick Gye employed sword swallower Ramo Samee as the "chief attraction" at the Royal Gardens Vauxhall Theatre in Kensington, one of the leading venues for public entertainment in London from the midth century to the midth century.

In the 's Samee created a sensation at the Garrick Theatre in London by performing his feat of swallowing beads and horse hair separately and then regurgitating the former threaded upon the latter. According to an article published in Robert Merry's Museum on January 1, Before the arrival in Europe of these jugglers, whose speculation, it is said, was most profitable, attempts had been made, but unsuccessfully, to induce other professors of the art to go to England for the purpose of exhibition.

According to London press clippings , Ramo Samee died a pauper at the age of 59 on August 21, According to an obituary in the The Gentlemen's Magazine , Volume City-road, in extreme poverty, Ramo Samee , a celebrated Indian juggler. His health had received a severe shock at the death of his only son, who, in attempting to swallow a sword, did himself such injury that he died shortly afterwards.

His body was interred in old St. Your early insertion of the widow's appeal, under the above head, in last week's paper, reflects the highest credit on you, and in remembrance of the plesure I experienced in the early days at his performance, I beg to hand you 10s from ten friends, collected in the neighbourhood of High Holborn, towards alleviating the sufferings of the poor widow and family Poor Ramo is to be buried today, and his funeral expenses have to be defrayed by instalments.

The trifle obtained has been handed to Mrs. Pancras , Middlesex, London, England. Ramo Samee Timeline Born in East India Arrives in London, performs at Pall Mall Street Jan 12, 18, 29, Feb 8: Olympic Theatre London Royalty Theatre London Royal Coburg Theatre London Royal Gardens Vauxhall Theatre London Last appearance at Vauxhall Gardens London Adelphi Theatre London New Strand Subscription Theatre London Royal Victoria Theatre London Royal Beulah Spa Norwood s: Garrick Theatre London Theatre Royal London Robert Merry's Museum London Son died of sword swallowing injury According to broadside scrapbooks kept by William Hay in England, one broadside announces the arrival of 'Saib Khan Ing' in Preston in to 'exhibit his astonishing performances' at juggling, sword swallowing, and, 'chang[ing] himself from an Indian juggler to a British Minister of State' Hay Signor Tomaso Richmond Hill Theatre Barnum founded the American Dime Museum in Boston, which included oddities and freaks of nature, including working acts such as sword swallowers.

The "American Museum" burned down in , at which time Barnum retired from show business. According to an article in the Philadeplphia "Pennsylvanian" newspaper dated November 27, They will leap over elephants, and even five camels side by side; their bodies are so pliant that they will twine themselves like snakes up and down between the steps of a ladder; they walk over sharp swords; raise heavy burdens with their eyelids; and like Ramo Samee of old, are said to be able to float in the air without any visible support.

Even the children exercise themselves in swallowing small sticks of bamboo, in order that they may eventually do the like with swords and daggers. Born June 12, Married Performed mid s? Mitchell was born in her father's traveling van in Coventry on June 12, At the age of 16, around , she married showman Henry James Wallis who was a fairground proprietor and showman of the old school.

Wallis was born in Liverpool on May 11, At first Wallis worked as a photographer on the fairgrounds, but he later became a riding master of some note, and was also the founder of Seaforth Fair and one of the founders of the Van Dweller's Association , which later became the Showmen's Guild of Great Britain.

Martha Mitchell 's brother was Charlie Mitchell , the famous bare knuckle boxer who fought J. Sullivan and Gentleman Jim Corbett. Martha Mitchell died by the age of 30, circa Martha Mitchell Birth Certificate. Sword swallower Lawson Peck was known to have performed at the Peoria Museum in According to the announcement in the Peoria Transcript , dated Oct.

Lawson Peck from New York, the greatest sword swallower living, to give two performances Friday and Saturday nights at the museum. The sword, 23 inches long, may be inspected by the audience.

He will also bare his neck and swallow the sword up to the hilt, a feat never attempted by a living man before.

No additional charge to the museum. Jack Naylor collected a number of interesting photographs, including this rare photo of a sword swallower from the s. Could this have been sword swallower Lawson Peck? Unknown Sword Swallower from s. According to an article in the Pittsburgh Daily Post dated January 10, It seems that a traveling company of players gave a show there some time ago, and shortly after all the goods and chattels were seized on a writ against one Poguee for failure to pay his board All this was interesting of course, but the agony was reached when " Signor Forrestelle " the great sword-swallower was put upon the stand.

Signor carried his sword with him and the lawyers wanted to see him swallow it, and so asked if he had any objections to showing his performance. He had none, and down went twenty-seven inches of steel, to the gratification of the lawyers. Signor handed his sword to the admiring legal gentlemen, asking them to examine and see that there was no fraud. He had a very business-like air, and when asked what other branches his business took in, he remarked that it was his habit to eat marbles.

Everybody wanted to see him eat marbles, and down went four good-sized "allies. Signor 's performance was "immense," and had a jury witnessed this novel exposition of a legal point, his fortune would have been made.

And Signor Forestell , the sword swallower, who performed outside of a museum in the old St. Ignatius building on Market Street where the Emporium now stands. This individual actually slid canes, bayonets and swords down his throat to the amazement of the gathered throng. But this class of fakir was only doing his bit as an entertainer, and harmed no one but himself, while the real simon pure medical fakir was the individual who did untold injury to all those who sought relief from him.

There is a sword-swallower, P rof. Forestell , whose feats are marvelous. He actually swallows solid steel swords and bayonets, also ordinary walking canes with equal facility. Signor Forestelle performed for over 31 years. Signor Forestelle Timeline Vannuchi's Museum New Orleans San Francisco Museum John Robinson's Circus at Lincoln Park According to the "London Labour and the London Poor" , Sallementro learned sword and snake swallowing at the age of 17 or 18 from his friend Clarke who was also a sword and snake swallower: It was a mate of mine that I was with that first put me up to sword and snake swallowing.

I copied off him, and it took me about three months to learn it. I began with a sword first - of course not a sharp sword, but a blunt-pointed - and I didn't exactly know how to do it, for there's a trick to it. At first it turned me, putting it down my throat past my swallow, right down, about 18 inches. It made my swallow sore, very sore, and I used lemon and sugar to cure it. It was tight at first, and I kept pushing it down further and further. There's one thing - you mustn't cough, and until you're used to it, you want to very bad, and then you must pull it up again.

My sword was about three-quarters of an inch wide. At first I didn't know the trick of doing it, but I found it out this way. You see, the trick is you must oil the sword - the best sweet oil, worth 14 pence a pint - and you put it on with a sponge.

Then, you understand, if the sword scratches the swallow, it don't make it sore, 'cos the oil heals it up again. When first I put the sword down, before I oiled it, it used to come up quite slimy, but after the oil it slips down quite easy, and is as clean when it comes up as before it went down. The knives are easier to do than the sword because they are shorter. We puts them right down till the handle rests on the mouth.

The sword is about 18 inches long, and the knives about 8 inches in the blade. People run away with the idea that you slip the blades down your breast, but I always hold mine right up with the neck bare, and they see it go into the mouth 'atween the teeth.

They also fancy it hurts you, but it don't, or what a fool I should be to do it. I don't mean to say it don't hurt you at first, 'cos it do, for my swallow was very bad, and I couldn't eat anything but liquids for two months whilst I was learning.

I cured my swallow whilst I was stretching it with lemon and sugar. I was the second one that ever swallowed a snake. I was about 17 or 18 years old when I learnt it.

The first was Clarke as did it. He done very well with it, but he wasn't out no more than two years before me, so he wasn't known much. In the country there is some places where, when you do it, they swear you are the devil, and won't have it nohow.

The snakes I use are about 18 inches long, and you must first cut the stingers out, 'cos it might hurt you. I always keep two or three by me for my performances. I keep them warm, and I give them nothing to eat but worms and gentles. I generally keep them in flannel or hay in a box. I've three at home now. When first I began swallowing snakes, they tasted queer like. They draw'd the roof of the mouth a bit. It's a roughish taste. The scales rough you a bit when you draw them up.

You see, a snake will go into ever such a little hole, and they are smooth one way. The head of the snake goes about an inch and a half down the throat, and the rest of it continues in the mouth, curled 'round like.

I hold him by the tail, and when I pinch it, he goes right in. You must cut the stinger out or he'll injure you. The tail is slipppery, but you nip it with the nails like pinchers. If you was to let go, he'd go right down, but most snakes will stop at two inches down the swallow, and then they bind like a ball in the mouth.

I generally get my snakes by giving little boys ha'pence to go and catch 'em in the woods. I get them when I'm pitching in the country. I'll get as many as I can get, and bring 'em up to London for my engagements.

When first caught, the snake is slimy, and I have to clean him by scraping him with a cloth, and then with another, until he's nice and clean. I have put 'em down slimy, on purpose to taste what it was like.

It had a nasty taste, very nasty. When I exhibit, I first holds the snake up in the air and pinches the tail, to make it curl about and twist 'round my arm, to show that he is alive. Then I holds it above my mouth, and as soon as he sees the hole, in he goes. He goes wavy-like, as a ship goes, that's the comparison.

I always hold my breath whilst his head is in my swallow. When he moves in the swallow, it tickles a little, but it don't make you want to retch. In my opinion, he is more glad to come up than to go down, for it seems to be too hot for him.

I keep him down about two minutes. If I breathe or cough, he draws out and curls back again. I think there's artfulness in some of them big snakes, for they seem to know which is the master.

I was at Wombwell's Menagerie of Wild Beasts for 3 months, and I had the care of a big snake, as thick 'round as my arm. I wouldn't attempt to put that one down my throat, for I think I might easier have done down his'n. It was a f'urren snake, all over spots, called a boa-constrictor. Performed Died Donnell was sword swallower with a side show in the Pittsburgh area in and was sought by his mother, Eliza Donnell. Mother seeks James S Donnell. Stewart was a Scottish recipient of the Victoria Cross , the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

Stewart was 26 years old, and a Captain in the 93rd Sutherland Highlanders when he was awarded the Victoria Cross for his actions at Lucknow. On October 19, , while at Hythe, Hampshire, Stewart was giving a demonstration of sword swallowing. His demonstration went fatally wrong and he died from internal injuries a week later, on October 26, at the age of Stewart is buried in a vault at St. Mary's Church , Grandtully, Scotland.

Born Performed Died July 26, He became so skilled as a rider that he toured Europe with the circus. Benedetti began learning sword swallowing at the age of 14 in , and eventually became proficient at it by the age of 20 in According to an article dated May 30, in the Daily Phoenix: Maury introduced to the faculty and students Signor Carlo Benedetti , a professional sword swallower, on whom he proposed to make a surgical examination.

Benedetti first swallowed a sword blade twenty-three inches in length, and bending over, completely bent the steel. Next he placed a sabre, measuring twenty-nine inches in length down his throat to the hilt. The medical examiners discovered that the blade of the weapon stretches the oesophagus and distends the lower wall of the stomach. Benedetti then swallowed six thin, light swords at once, then extricated them with such ease as to excite the wonder of all the beholders. He next took an ordinary musket, weighing eleven pounds, with a common bayonet afixed.

This bayonet he thrust into his throat by raising the musket butt into the air. When it was in he bowed all around to the company. He then drew the weapon out gracefully and easily, and explained that the point of leverage fell upon his lower jaw and teeth, which are very strong.

The Captain General was present, and the novelty of the evening was the feat of the sword swallower, Benedetti , who attempted to cram an umbrella down his throat. He swallowed His Excellency the Captain General's sword, a cane, and other articles, but could not stomach the umbrella.

Benedetti 's marvellous performance at the Royal Aquarium ". In , Benedetti was described swallowing a cane in the September 30, Atlanta Constitution. In , the editor of a London magazine described Signor Benedetti who had just performed at the Westminster Royal Aquarium and Canterbury Hall at the age of According to the description, Benedetti stood 5 ft 8 inches tall, and swallowed a blade that was About one year ago Benedetti began to give evidence that his mind was affected.

He imagined he was a millionaire and threw his money away. Fifteen years ago he was famous all over the world as a sword swallower. Signor Carlos Benedetti Timeline Joined circus as rider Began learning sword swallowing at 14 Began performing as sword swallower at 20 Tacon Theatre Havana Cuba Royal Aquarium Westminster London Jan 9, 18, July 3, Aug 5: Crystal Palace London New York NY Began losing mental facilities Committed to mental asylum, Morris Plains NJ Senor Franco the "sword swallower and stone eater" performed at Manly Beach, Australia on April 4, Four years later he was performing in San Francisco California on March 12, He swallowed a 23 inch long sword.

Born May 15, Performed Died January 3, He entered the circus business as a sword swallower for a few years around at about the age of He then became an operator and manager of his own sideshow. During the Civil War, he was twice sentenced to be shot for dissertion; the first time, as a mere boy, he was pardoned by President Lincoln ; the second time, succeeded in escaping.

In later years, he was considered one of the best shots in Indiana. Erwin was married once, but the union was not a happy one. He died of pneumonia in Indianapolis, IN on January 3, at the age of Keller was fascinated by the feat and persuaded the sword swallower to visit his clinic and have his throat examined with a laryngeal mirror.

Adolf Kussmaul carefully observed the sword swallower, being especially interested in the way he positioned his head for the passage of the long straight sword, and decided to examine him himself. For this purpose, Dr. Kussmaul had a local musical instrument maker named Fischer fashion tubes 47 cm long and 13 mm in diameter, one being round and the other elliptical in design, the tubes fitted with conical wooden mandarins to facilitate insertion.

Using the straight tube, mirrors and a gasoline lamp, Kussmaul inspected the esophagus and the fundus of the stomach, thereby performing the first successful esophagoscopy esophagogastrostomy on a sword swallower in The sword swallower tolerated the long tubes well, but the examination was disappointing because the light was too weak to illuminate the field so far from its source. Also, despite washing out the stomach, fluid constantly collected around the tube and hindered the view.

However Kussmaul was so pleased with his success that he took the sword swallower with him to perform demonstrations in various clinics, and later enlisted other sword swallowers due to their ability to voluntarily relax the cricopharyngeal muscle and form a straight line from the pharynx to the stomach, allowing passage of the rigid endoscope. Today Kussmaul is recognized as the developer of the first rigid endoscope. Kussmaul died in Heidelberg, and his grave is located in a cemetary in Heidelberg, Germany.

Adolph Kussmaul Dr. Adolf Kussmaul later Dr. Adolf Kussmaul Heidelburg Dr. Adolf Kussmaul grave Heidelberg. According to an article in "The Youth's Companion" dated October 29, A famous French physician lately experimented upon a Chinese conjuror, who swallowed a sword nearly three feet long, and permitted an examination of his body while the blade was in its living sheath.

Fourle such was the anatomists's name was thoroughly satisfied with the honesty of the operation. They traced the point along its downward course, and felt it thirty inches from the swallower's mouth.

So we may set down sword and poker swallowing as genuine feats of gymnastics. Article Oct 29, The first known photograph of an Indian Sword Swallower was displayed in England at the South Kensington Exhibition of in an album of photographs entitled "Trades and Occupations of India" in response to English curiousity about the British Empire in India.

Performed Died April 11, According to an article in the New York Herald dated July 15, , and another article in the New York Times dated July 16, , a novel performance was offered at the Olympic Theatre on July 15, by Ling Look , "who disposes mysteriously but satisfactorily of a blade ninety centimetres in length.

A quote from describes Ling Look's performace: How much sword he took we are not prepared to state; but he did not perish. In a showman named Heinrich Kellar , who went by the name Harry Kellar , put together a show troupe that included Link Look. During this time, Kellar learned some secrets of the business, and began his solo work until the opportunity came to join the spectacle of the Davenports Brothers in From to , Kellar and Fay toured South America.

In the spring of , Kellar , 24, along with William Marion Fay , both junior pseudo-spiritualists, left the Davenports show in the spring of and became independent performers, forming a partnership and putting together their own tour throughout America and Europe under the name Fay and Keller.

They were specialists of exceptional merit. Ling Look was known as the "Fire-King" , while Yamadeva was a contortionist of such rare powers that he was known as the "Man-Serpent" , and his movements were as graceful as a cat.

Kellar formed a troupe with the brothers under the name of "The Royal Illusionists". The party went to New York by the steamer Andes , narrowly escaping shipwreck off Hatteras in the March Equinoctial of After a short stay in New York, the trio crossed overland to California, and began an engagement at Baldwin's Academy of Music in San Francisco on the evening of May 15, Ling Look and Yamadeva posed as Chinese and Japanese performers, but in fact, according to various sources, were Hungarian from Budapest or Austrian from Vienna.

Ling Look performed as a fire-eater and sword swallower, and went by the title "King of Fire". With his head half-shaved, and the remaining hair in a long braid, he almost looked Chinese. Some of his feats included swallowing hot coals and red hot swords, then blowing fire from his mouth.

Meanwhile, Yamadeva was an accomplished contortionist who performed incredible escapes. He was also known as the Snake Man , due to his serpentine or feline movements. The infernal dinner fire eating 2. The poor of India escape 3. Yamadeva the snake contortion 4. Their show consisted of a spiritualist cabin with Kellar and Cunard performing cage disappearance and escapes from ropes and handcuffs, and contortion by Yamadeva , and for the finale, the fire and sword acts by Ling Look.

In Sydney, they played a successful engagement at the Victoria Theater. During their ten weeks' engagement in Australia they performed to capacity houses everywhere. Sir Hercules Robinson , Lady Robinson and suite were frequent attendants at the entertainments of the Illusionists. From Australia they went to Java, and from there on to Shanghai, China In early October Yamadeva suffered heart pains while playing a pin bowling game in Shanghai China.

They were watching a husky sea captain who was using a huge ball and making a double spare at every roll, when Yamadeva suddenly remarked, "I can handle one as heavy as that big loafer can.

But he misjudged his own strength, for he had no sooner delivered the ball than he grasped his side moaning in pain. He barely had enough strength to get back to the ship, where he immediately went to bed. Four days later, he died while onboard the ship heading to Hong Kong.

An examination showed that he had ruptured an artery. Shortly after their arrival in Hong Kong, Ling Look underwent an operation for a liver trouble, and died under the knife. Six months later, his brother Ling Look died on April 11 or 14? In , a fakir with the same name, the same routine, Chinese look, hair and costume style appeared in England and claimed to be the original Ling Look.

He wore his make-up both on and off stage, and performed Ling Look's show perfectly. This performer claimed that the news of his death in was not true, and that he was still alive. In , a commentary in the newspaper La Capital de Rosario , dated August 9, , gave news of an artist with an exotic name who was performing in town.

It was Ling Look , who it was claimed, had worked as director of a great illusionist and acrobatic troupe, in their inimitable work with the infernal dinner, and swallowing swords. The same name and the same routines, the one who so successfully passed through Rosario with his brother Yamadeva in ? But this was not possible, unless the advertised Look Ling had risen, or was a phony. The litmus test was when this Ling Look clashed with Kellar , who had buried the original Ling Look in The imitator had the nerve to stick to his story even when confronted by Kellar.

Bouchard, Emile Longtime Montreal Canadiens captain Boulez, Pierre World-renowned French classical music conductor Former Indiana Governor and U. Health and Human Services Secretary Bowie, David Legendary British singer and boundary-breaking musician Bowman, Christopher Former U. The first black managing editor of The New York Times Boyle, Patricia Former federal judge Boynton Robinson, Amelia U. Brady, James Former White House press secretary Brady, Sarah Kemp Gun control activist Author penned novel "To Sir, With Love" that became a movie Brancheau, Dawn SeaWorld trainer killed by a whale Fredric Pioneering dermatologist, author and early proponent of Botox Brandt, Margit Fashion icon led international breakthroughs for Danish designs Branton, Leo Lawyer helped radical Angela Davis win sensational murder case Navy diver, portrayed in the film ''Men of Honor" Brasse, Wilhelm Auschwitz prisoner and photographer Brazda, Rudolf Last surviving person interned by Nazis because of his homosexuality Brecker, Michael Versatile and influential tenor saxophonist won 11 Grammys Breed, MC Michigan rapper burst onto the national scene in Breen, Bobby Former child star best known in the s Breitbart, Andrew Conservative media publisher and activist Brennan, Eileen Actress starred in "Private Benjamin" Brenner, David Comedian, actor, author Briban, Roxana Romanian opera singer Bridges, Dorothy Matriarch of the acting family that includes sons Jeff and Beau Brillstein, Bernie Veteran Hollywood manager, producer and power broker Brinker, Norman Restaurant mogul who built casual dining empire Brinkman, Eddie Record-setting shortstop had a year career in the majors and coached the White Sox Broder, David Pulitzer Prize-winning political reporter and columnist Brodeur, Denis Father of star goalie Martin Brodeur Pioneering Jewish feminist writer Bronson, Charles Grim-faced tough guy made his mark with action films like the "Death Wish" series Brooks, Cedric Influential roots reggae musician Brooks, Herb Former Olympic hockey coach led U.

Brooks, Martin Actor who played Dr. Brothers, Jim Kansas sculptor, whose works are at historical monuments around the country Brothers, Joyce Pop psychologist pioneered the television advice show Brotman, Jeff Costco chairman co-founded the warehouse retailer Browder, Kalief Teen who was jailed 3 years without trial, then freed Brown, Bonnie Member of country music vocal group the Browns Brown, Chris All-Star third baseman played six seasons in the majors in the s Brown, Chuck Musician widely acclaimed as the "Godfather of go-go" Brown, Cynthia Human Rights Watch activist Brown, Eric British pilot who flew more types of airplanes than anyone else in history Brown, Errol Hot Chocolate singer Brown, Gates Former Tigers outfielder Brown, Helen Gurley Legendary editor of Cosmopolitan magazine Brown, James The dynamic, pompadoured "Godfather of Soul" General manager helped Pittsburgh Pirates win 2 World Series titles Brown, Linda Student in the landmark Brown v.

Board of Education U. Brown, Marcia Award-winning children's book illustrator Brown, Michael Teenager was fatally shot by a police officer Brown, Nappy Blues singer climbed the Billboard charts with his gospel-influenced style Brown, Ruth Whose recordings shot her to rhythm-and-blues stardom in the s Brown, Vivian Famous San Francisco twin Brown, Wesley Oldest sitting U.

Browne, Joy Nationally syndicated call-in talk show host Browne, Malcolm Photograper of Vietnamese burning monk Browne, Sylvia Popular psychic and author Browning, James The nation's longest-serving federal appellate judge Brunetti, Argentina A character actress who played the worried wife of Mr.

Martini in the classic film "It's a Wonderful Life" Buchwald, Art Pulitzer Prize winning columnist chronicled the life and times of Washington Buck, Leslie Created the cardboard cup that became a pop-culture emblem of New York Erudite Ivy Leaguer and conservative commentator Buffone, Doug Former Chicago Bears linebacker Building Explosion Victims, Harlem At least seven have died in a gas explosion Bumpers, Dale Former U.

Bunch, Jon Co-founder and lead singer for the emo band Sense Field Burden, Chris Noted performance artist and sculptor Burns, Conrad Former Republican U.

Burns, Marilyn "Texas Chainsaw Massacre" actress Burri, Rene Prominent Swiss photographer Burton, Roderick Up-and-coming rapper known as "Dolla" Burton, Tony Actor played the trainer in six "Rocky" films Brother to one U. Buster, Prince Legendary pioneer of ska music Butcher, Susan Four-time Iditarod champion dominated the 1,mile sled dog race in the late s Butler, Robert Pulitzer Prize-winning expert on aging who coined the phrase "ageism" Bygraves, Max Veteran British entertainer known for his old-fashioned charm Byrd, Donald Leading hard-bop trumpeter of the s Former senator from Virginia Byrd, Robert The longest-serving senator in history Byrne, Jane Chicago's first and only female mayor Cady, Frank Played the general-store owner on "Green Acres" Caesar, Sid Comic genius of s television Cahir, Bill Former journalist who joined the Marines after September 11th Calero, Adolfo Former Nicaragua Contra leader Calero, Miguel Played with Mexican soccer club Pachuca Callahan, James "Jim" Former Kentucky state representative Calley, John Ran three Hollywood studios Camerino, Giuliana Coen Designer credited with making handbags a fashion item Camp, Rick Former Atlanta Braves pitcher Campbell, Bill Philadelphia radio and TV sports announcer Campbell, Carroll Politically savvy former governor who helped make the Republican Party a powerful force in South Carolina Campbell, Delois Legendary gospel singer Campbell, Glen "Rhinestone Cowboy" country singer Civil rights leader and renegade preacher Camping, Harold Doomsday minister and Christian evangelist Campos, Adriana Popular telenovela actress Camuto, Vince Legendary women's footwear designer Cantu, Sandra 8-year-old girl had been missing for several days Capa, Cornell Pioneering photojournalist used his camera to illuminate social and humanitarian causes Caray, Skip Voice of the Atlanta Braves and part of a family line of baseball broadcasters Carey, Harry Character actor whose career spanned over 50 years Carey, Hugh Former New York governor Carey, William Polk Entrepreneur who donated millions to education Carlile, Kaiser Batboy struck in head by practice swing Carlin, George Dean of counterculture comedians was known for his biting insights on life Carmen, Jeanne s pinup and B-movie actress hobnobbed with Frank Sinatra and other stars Caro, Anthony British sculptor of large, abstract steel creations Carpenter, Scott 2nd US astronaut in orbit Carr, Charles Drove country music legend Hank Williams on his last trip Carr, Johnnie Prominent civil rights activist over the past half century Carr, Sam Mississippi Delta musician was one of the best blues drummers in the country Carrell, Mike Washington state senator Carrillo Fernandez, Simon Adrian Carrington, Leonora Painter, writer and sculptor considered one of the last of the original surrealists Carson, Joanne Ex-wife of former 'Tonight Show' host Carson, Julia Seven-term Indianapolis Representative Carter, Beverly Realtor who disappeared last week Carter, Don Bowling great during the golden age of the game Carter, Elliott Pulitzer Prize winning classical composer Carter, Gary Hall of Fame major league baseball player Carter, Jack Comedian and actor Carter, Janette The last surviving child of country music's founding Carter Family Carter, Nell Who played the stout, sassy housekeeper on the s sitcom "Gimme a Break!

Carter, Robert Lawyer who worked on Brown v. Artist's illustrations graced "The Shadow" and other sci-fi and mystery publications Casale, Bob Founding guitarist for Devo Casares, Rick Star running back for the Chicago Bears Cash, June Carter Grammy-winning scion of one of country music's pioneering families and wife of Johnny Cash Cashen, Frank Former Mets general manager Cassady, Carolyn Writer and friend of Jack Kerouac Cassese, Antonio Renowned international law expert prosecuted war crimes Castor, Jimmy Funk and soul saxophonist, singer and songwriter Catlett, Elizabeth Sculptor and printmaker Catri, Dick Surfing pioneer was known as "the godfather of East Coast surfing" Cavanaugh, Christine Prolific voice actress Cecil, Henry One of British horse racing's greatest trainers Cellucci, Argeo Paul Former Massachusetts governor Chabrol, Claude French filmmaker was one of the founders of the New Wave movement Chacon, Bobby Former two-time world boxing champion Challis, John Teen inspired professional sports players with his positive attitude about having cancer Chance, Britton Biophysicist was also an Olympic gold medalist sailor Chance, Dean Cy Young-winning pitcher who palled around with Sinatra Chandnois, Lynn s special teams star for the Pittsburgh Steelers Chapot, Frank Equestrian won two silver medals in six Olympics Charles, Ray The Grammy-winning crooner who blended gospel and blues Chartoff, Robert "Rocky," "Raging Bull" movie producer Chaykin, Maury Canadian actor whose career spans 35 years and two countries Chedid, Andree Egyptian-born French poet and writer Chepe, Oscar Espinosa Cuban dissident economist Chereau, Patrice Celebrated French actor and director Chernomyrdin, Viktor Served as Russia's prime minister in the turbulent s Chess, Phil Music exec co-founded the legendary Chess Records label First black lawyer in Selma, Alabama, was prominent in civil rights cases Child, Julia Whose warbling, encouraging voice and able hands brought the intricacies of French cuisine Chiluba, Frederick Zambia's first democratically elected president Chisholm, Shirley An advocate for minority rights who became the first black woman elected to Congress Chopra, Yash Bollywood movie mogul Christensen, Todd Professional football player and sportscaster Christian, Linda Hollywood starlet who became the first Bond girl Christopher, Sybil Theater producer and ex-wife of Richard Burton Church Shooting Victims, Charleston Pastor, 8 others fatally shot at church Ciccone, Don Singer-songwriter who was a member of the Four Seasons Cirillo, Nathan Canadian soldier guarding war memorial Claiborne, Liz Fashion designer's styles became a cornerstone of career women's wardrobes Clancy, Gil Boxing trainer who helped lead Emile Griffith to welterweight and middleweight titles Clark, Guy Country singer-songwriter won a Grammy Award Clark, Huguette Montana copper heiress once lived in the largest apartment on Fifth Avenue Clark, Kelly Attorney fought for childhood victims of sexual abuse An educator and psychologist who spent his life working for racial integration Visionary science fiction writer won worldwide acclaim with more than books Clarke, Ron Australia's greatest middle distance runner Clarke, Warren British actor Clarke, William "Bunny Rugs" Husky-voiced reggae singer Clauson, Bryan Popular dirt track racer Clements, Bill Former Texas governor Clerides, Glafcos Former Cyprus president Cliburn, Van Internationally celebrated pianist helped thaw the Cold War Coachman Davis, Alice First black woman to win Olympic gold Coase, Ronald Oldest Nobel Prize winner House member in North Carolina Who became a legal superstar after helping clear O.

Cockburn, Alexander Longtime columnist for The Nation magazine Cocker, Joe Award winning British singer Coe, George Veteran film and TV character actor Coe-Jones, Dawn Canadian hall of fame golfer Cogdill, Gail Former Detroit Lions wide receiver Cohen, Avi Liverpool defender and first Israeli to play in England''s top soccer league Cohen, Carla Co-owner of popular D.

Cohen, Leonard Legendary singer-songwriter penned "Hallelujah" Cole, George Veteran British actor known best for "Minder" Cole, Natalie Grammy-winning singer Coleman, Jerry Hall of Fame broadcaster Coleman, Ornette Innovative jazz saxophonist and composer Collapse Victims, Mecca Crane More than 65 people killed in crane accident at mosque Colledge, Cecilia Innovative figure skater was the youngest athlete to compete in the Winter Olympics Collier, Jason Atlanta Hawks center Collins, Bud Sportscaster provided decades of tennis commentary on TV Collins, Jerry Former All Blacks rugby player Collins, Marva Innovative Chicago educator Colmes, Alan Radio and TV political talk show host Colvin, Marie Respected American war reporter Commoner, Barry Scientist and one of the pioneers of the environmental movement Como, Perry Crooning baritone barber known for his relaxed vocals, cardigan sweaters and TV specials Acclaimed author of twin novels "Mrs.

Conner, Bruce Beat-era artist made groundbreaking avant-garde films Connors, Mike Actor starred on the detective series "Mannix" Connors, Tom Country-folk singer and one of Canada's biggest cultural icons Conrad, Paul Political cartoonist who won three Pulitzer Prizes Conroy, Pat Best-selling author drew upon rough childhood experience as military brat Cooley, Denton Surgeon performed world's first artificial heart implant Cooper, Henry Heavyweight boxer once knocked down Muhammad Ali Cooper, Jackie Won a best actor Oscar nomination at the age of Cope, Myron Screechy-voiced announcer's colorful catch phrases became symbols of the Pittsburgh Steelers Surgeon was part of the medical team that saved Martin Luther King Jr First woman to hold the top editorial post at The Baltimore Sun newspaper Corliss, Richard Time magazine longtime film critic Cornelius, Don "Soul Train" creator and longtime host Coryell, Don NFL coach and a founding father of modern passing game Coryell, Larry Jazz guitarist was known as the Godfather of Fusion Cossette, John Longtime executive producer of the Grammy Awards Cossiga, Francesco Former President of Italy Costanza, Margaret Veteran political activist and women's rights champion Cotton, Dorothy Civil rights pioneer worked alongside the Rev.

Cotton, James Legendary blues harp player won a Grammy in Courreges, Andre French fashion designer and miniskirt pioneer Court, Hazel English actress starred in popular horror movies of the s and '60s Courtenay, Bryce Best-selling Australian author Covey, Joy Former Amazon executive Covington, Joey Former Jefferson Airplane drummer Cowan, George Manhattan Project scientist Craig Lewis, Joyce Female Philadelphia firefighter dies in house fire Craighead George, Jean Newbery Medal-winning author Cramer, Richard Ben Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author Crane, Phil Former Illinois congressman Crash Victims, Colombia Plane 75 people, including many soccer players, are killed Crash Victims, Colorado Van Amtrak train-van collision leaves 5 dead Crash Victims, Flydubai All 62 people onboard the aircraft have died Crash Victims, Georgia Southern Five students killed in multiple vehicle crash Crash Victims, Philly Amtrak Eight dead after train derailed Craven, Wes Iconic film director whose name is synonymous with horror Crenchaw, Milton One of the last original Tuskegee Airmen instructors Crewe, Bob Wrote string of hits for the Four Seasons Crews, Harry Author and cult favorite whose hard and crazy times inspired his brutal tales Crough, Suzanne "The Partridge Family" child star Crowder, Eddie Spent nearly half a century as U.

Crumley, James Crime novelist whose hardened detectives worked cases in dingy Montana bars Cruz, Celia Cuban-born singer started out singing in Havana nightclubs and became the "Queen of Salsa" Jay Trooper died in helicopter crash at white nationalist rally in Charlottesville..

Cummings, Bart Legendary Australian racehorse trainer Cunningham, Merce Avant-garde dancer and choreographer who revolutionized modern dance Cuomo, Mario Former governor or New York Curran, Jack High school coaching great Curtis, Ann Swimmer won three medals at the Olympic Games Cygan, John Actor played a detective on "The Commish" D'Amico, Cecchi Screenwriter of classic Italian neo-realist films Dahl, Sandy Widow of pilot of United Flight 93 dies Dailey, Janet Romance writer whose books sold more than million copies Daily, Bill Comedic TV sidekick Dal Canton, Bruce Former teacher had a lengthy career as a major league pitcher and coach Dale Oen, Alexander World champion swimmer from Norway Daley, Maggie Former Chicago first lady Dalla, Lucio Italian singer-songwriter sold millions of records worldwide Daly, Mary Radical feminist theology professor Dana, Bill Famed research test pilot Dana , Paul Indy Racing League driver, and former motorsports journalist Daniels, Judith Glassman Pioneering magazine editor, first woman to serve as top editor of Life Daniels, Paul British magician and entertainer Dankworth, John British jazz composer, saxophonist and band leader Darcel, Denise French-born actress known for vampy roles Dark, Alvin Longtime manager and star shortstop Darling, Jean Child actor in the "Our Gang" comedy film series Davenport, Lee Developed radar that helped U.

David, Hal Legendary songwriter partnered with Burt Bacharach Davidson, Bill Detroit Pistons owner and noted philanthropist Davidson, Gordon Film, theater director founded L. Cardiac surgeon who was fatally shot Davies, Howard Acclaimed British theatre director Davies, John Howard Cherubic child actor became influential British television producer Actress on "The Brady Bunch" Davis, Jack Champion hurdler won two Olympic silver medals in the s Davis, Jo Ann Virginia's first woman elected to Congress Member of the Navy Blue Angels died in a crash while performing Davis, Michael Bassist of influential late s rock band MC Davis, Ossie An actor distinguished for roles dealing with racial injustice on stage, screen and in real life Davis, Shaniya 5-year-old had been missing for one week Davis, Steve Former Oklahoma quarterback Dawkins, Darryl NBA player known for his thunderous dunks Dawkins, Jimmy Chicago bluesman Dayan, Assi Iconic Israeli filmmaker Dayton, Bruce Retailer built family's company into what became Target De Laurentiis, Dino Prolific film producer and entrepreneur Dean, Jimmy Country music legend and sausage entrepreneur Dean, Millvina Last survivor of the "unsinkable" Titanic Deaver, Michael Close adviser to Ronald Reagan DeBakey, Michael Cardiovascular surgeon who pioneered heart bypass surgery DeBerry, Lois Longtime Tenn.

DeBruin, Lynn Associated Press sports writer DeCarava, Roy Photographer who captured Harlem's everyday life DeCrow, Karen Women's rights movement leader Dee, Paul Former University of Miami athletic director Dee, Ruby Beloved actor and civil rights activist Dee, Sandra The blond beauty who attracted a large teen audience in the s Del Pozo, Jesus One of Spain's most influential style modernizers Della Casa, Lisa Opera diva widely acclaimed as one of the finest sopranos of her generation The innovative automaker who left a promising career in Detroit to develop the stainless steel-skinned Delp, Brad Lead singer for the band Boston Demps, Benjamin Former Kansas City school superintendent Denktash, Rauf Former Turkish Cypriot leader Denmark, Leila Oldest practicing physician in the world Denver, Bob Whose portrayal of goofy first mate Gilligan on the s television show "Gilligan's Island" made him an iconic figure Derby, Pat 'Flipper,' 'Lassie' trainer-turned-activist Derr, Allen Idaho lawyer won landmark anti-discrimination case Derwinski, Edward First U.

Desio, Alfred Broadway veteran invented a form of electronically enhanced tap dancing called Tap-Tronics Dewdney, Anna Best-selling children's author was known for her "Llama Llama" stories Di Stefano, Alfredo Real Madrid soccer great Di Stefano, Giuseppe One of the greatest tenors of the 20th century Dickens, Hazel Folk singer and bluegrass musician who advocated for coal miners Dickens, Jimmy Oldest Opry Member Diddley, Bo Rock 'n' roll innovator inspired with distinctive "shave and a haircut, two bits" rhythm Didlake, Emma A Michigan woman believed to be the nation's oldest veteran Dienstbier, Jiri Czech dissident who helped topple Communist regime Dietrich II, William S.

Steel executive-turned-philanthropist who pledged major gifts to universities Diller, Phyllis Pioneering standup comic Dillon, Denis Former D. Roman Catholic clergyman served as bishop of Richmond, Virginia, for 13 years In addition to piano, Wayne adds some organ on several cuts.

Wayne pounds away on the piano and adds swirling chords on the organ while Robillard picks out more tasty licks. It is a fitting close, showing the depth of Wayne's musical experiences. There are some who have lamented the future of blues piano due to the recent passing of Pinetop Perkins. This one is a contender for best Blues recording of the year and should not be missed. Street date, May 24th.

Just minutes into the bonus DVD included in Stony Plain Records' 35th anniversary double-disc collection, label founder Holger Petersen proclaims his fondness for the "realness" and the "rawness" of the blues. Petersen also loves the idea of the "characters" that give this music life. The artists that fill the 41 tracks on this collection exhibit all of the above. This collection is comprehensive, with every facet of the label's history spoken for. A wealth of "extra" material is included, the highlight being an unreleased steamy, five song set from legendary slide master Robert Nighthawk recorded during a Toronto studio session.

Nighthawk's final recordings offer his lascivious storytelling with references to moonshine flowing and the night "beginning to rock" in "I'm Gonna Murder My Baby. Holger Petersen's self-described "kitchen table" record label serves as a reminder that the "little guys" can indeed make it when they put the music first. Stony Plain's catalog speaks for itself. If you are already a fan, this one is it really her 30th album? Rory Block is a powerful delta blues guitar player because what she plays comes from a lifetime of dedication to the blues musical legacy.

The work she continues with this album is adding to her own artistic legacy. Bob Carpenter, who died in , was never famous or successful, but he was revered by many in the folk scene for his songwriting. He only released one album in his life, and although it had a hot-shot producer in Brian Ahearn and top musicians like Lowell George, it never sold a lot of copies. This group of demos, available only by digital download on Stony Plain Records, has sat in a Vancouver recording studio for 30 years.

The production is spare, but this is a great reminder of what a great songwriter Carpenter was. With his rough, bluesy voice, he comes up with lines I wish I could have written, such as "I believe in the light but I might be some time on the shady side.

Throughout the album, the main focus is usually on the interplay between Earl's strings and Limina's keys. The chemistry is superb throughout; so good, in fact, that the absence of vocals doesn't tarnish the album a bit, nor does it hinder the listener's ability to draw pictures from these songs.

I'd go so far as to say that Limina deserves some serious consideration for a "keyboard player of the year" nomination for his work here.

Of course, Earl's guitar is at the forefront most of the time, and not a single note disappointed these ears. As is usually the case, his playing is way on the high end of soulful with a healthy dose of jazz and just a touch of good funk mixed in. At his best, he's also one of the most melodic guitarists I've found in any genre, and he's certainly darn near his best on this release. The disc opens with "Backstroke," a really nice swing number that sets the tone of the album with it's exceptional interplay between guitar and keyboard.

This is about the most energetic cut on the album, if you consider "energy" and "uptempo" to be synonymous - it's a fine opening piece and grabs the listener's attention right away. The disc really kicks into high gear on the emotion scale with the next few cuts. Donna," a tribute to his wife, is one of those beautiful, slow aching blues pieces - the melody is simple but elegant and leaves a lot of room for some of Earl's most introspective playing on the album.

The effect is haunting and long-lasting, and while I'd be hard pressed to name a true favorite on this release, this would probably come closest. He follows this masterwork with two well-chosen covers - well chosen both for their status as classics and for showing the diversity he's capable of.

Kenny Burrell's "Chitlins Con Carne" is given a brilliant treatment here. The precision work between Earl and Limina gives us a serious dose of subtle, slinky funk, the sort of piece where you hope the pretty blonde will get out on the dance floor and shake her shoulders. This is followed with perhaps the album's most surprising selection, the classic "Christo Redentor.

Tracks 5, 6 and 7 almost feel like a trilogy, both sonically and spiritually. Respectively entitled "Happy," "Patience" and "Miracle," these three pieces taken together are a nice microcosm of Earl's heart, soul and philosophy. At times, Earl's work here is reminiscent of some of the more slow and soulful early work that Carlos Santana used to present. I'm reminded of Roy Buchanan's take on "The Messiah Will Come Again;" the core emotion is one of deep spirituality, the kind that can only come from deep belief, from the heart Earl both pleads and soars on this track, and the effect is intense.

The piece features some beautifully sweet and low-key bass work provided by guest Paul Kochansk that provides a perfect foundation for this simple-yet-complex slow blues. Earl again does a fine job of conveying his own introspective spirituality here; it's yet another seemingly instant classic. The album's closing piece is "Blues For Bill," and I think it's a fantastic close. This is a slow and almost punchy porch type blues, though Earl gives it his trademark smooth and soulful work.

It's a fascinating piece to me, as I really like the version presented here, yet I'd love to hear somebody give this a rip as a true delta number, probably on a metal National and with some good slide work - the contrast between the two renditions of this piece would really be interesting. Ronnie chooses not to tour widely or do interviews, for the most part, but I sincerely hope to make the journey to his neck of the woods some day.

I'd love to shake his hand and thank him for the amazing body of work he's given to the world. Even within that impressive catalog of his, Spread The Love ranks as one of his best. It seems like only a few short months ago that Duke had his last release.

Can you believe that it has been a year since Stony Plain Records released his Stomp! Ex-Roomful of Blues bandmate Doug James gives a great tenor sax solo for the song. Duke gives us some modern-day lyrics to the Blues when he and his band rev it up for "Text Me. Not only is Duke Robillard a singer, but a writer, as well. He has written more than songs, many of which have been covered by other artists, including The Tan Canary, Johnny Adams. A champion of all things Canadian, Hus has found acceptance not only from east to west but overseas as well.

The album is from that experience and approach: Last year we played at the Vancouver Olympics in that role and we recently played Martinque, a French island in the Caribbean, and we were told we were the first Canadian band to ever perform there. We headlined the festival down there and a lot of the time I get criticized that my songs are too Canadian to work in the U.

In September of , I attended a concert honoring jazz historian Richard Sudhalter with Jeff Healey on the bill, only vaguely aware of Healey's pop music history and ignorant of his lifelong fascination with jazz performers of the s and s.

His remarkable laptop guitar playing strongly influenced by Eddie Lang and other early jazz masters and heartfelt singing of Tin Pan Alley hits made me an instant Jeff Healey fan; seeing him pick up a trumpet and blowing Louis Armstrong-inspired choruses only added to my amazement.

Beautiful Noise was taped earlier that year for a Canadian TV program, and captures a live set by Healey and his working octet of jazz players. Reeman Christopher Plock's booming bass saxophone recalls the sound of '20s jazz ensembles; he has a striking Roland Kirk-esque moment on "Sugar Blues," simutaneously playing soprano and alto sax. Other highlights include violinist Drew Jurecka recalling Joe Venuti on "Wild Cat," performed in duo with the leader; Terra Hazelton, the band's blues diva, lays the double entendres thick on "Long John;" and, ofcourse, Healey demonstrating his multiple talents.

He excels as a vocal balladeer on "If I Had You," which also contains an inspired trumpet solo. Healey's premature death, barely two years after this performance, was a tragedy for all lovers of swing. Maria Muldaur and band form a beautiful melody that puts you in a dream and when you wake up you find yourself singing along to it. The newest release from folk and roots staple Maria Muldaur has been nominated for a Grammy "best traditional folk album of the year" and this writer can't think of anyone who deserves it more.

In the 35 years since "Midnight at the Oasis" hit it big, Muldaur has received far too little credit for her contribution to roots and Americana music. Maria Muldaur puts a new album on the stacks at least once a year, without fail, and has done so for longer than most fans of folk and jug bands have been alive.

She was there, a radiant if petite proto-hippie-momma, when it all began, during the early '60s folk revival in Greenwich Village. Hanging out with Dylan and the Seegers and playing at the Newport Folk Music Festival as part of the Even Dozen Jug Band all carved a place for Muldaur in history, and a good number of good friends that would last the ages.

America's mando-laureate David Grisman sits in on a few tracks, as does the great Taj Mahal. Muldaur is bringing fresh fruit into the mix as well, inviting the young Kit Stovepipe to play national guitar on a number of traditional tunes. You could say that B. King and Aaron "T-Bone" Walker invented modern electric blues, a big-city sound in which the Mississippi Delta -- which continued to inform such contemporaries as Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf -- was a very distant echo.

So, unfortunately, have many generic-sounding recordings. To my hearing, the latter have the resonance more of roots rock or somebody's idea of it than of real blues; "blues rock" strikes me as -- with, inevitably, some worthy exceptions -- effectively rock, incidentally blues.

The standard complaint, fair or unfair but hardly mine alone, is that there's more hand -- the players are invariably adept at their instruments -- than heart in this approach.

For once, "masterpiece" -- the word is used on the back cover -- falls short of hyperbole. The record has almost hypnotic powers. I have listened to it repeatedly, each time in some state of awed consciousness. Joe Louis Walker no relation to T-Bone as far as I know first recorded in , and this is his 20th album. Though I know his early work, I lost track of him in the interim. Picking up on him in , I encounter a major blues artist at the peak of his powers. Because race is so much a part of any discussion of blues' history and higher meaning, it is necessary to note here that Walker is an African-American who has lived long enough born in to have grown up in blues culture, in other words at a time when blues was not -- as it has been for a long time now -- at the far margins of black life and entertainment.

Walker seems to have heard, seen or known just about every significant African-American vernacular and popular musician of the mid- to latterth century. In addition he was close friends with the late Mike Bloomfield, who did as much as anyone next, anyway, to the early Rolling Stones to introduce electric blues to a whole generation of white young people.

Afire with emotion, the songs, in common with all true blues, deliver convincingly lived-in storytelling. Just as gripping, "If There's a Heaven," written by Walker with Kevin Eubanks and Joe Russo, is a confession of sin by a petty criminal who yet strives to commit good. It's hard to believe psychological and spiritual complexity of this kind could be compacted into a song, even one that clocks in at 6: Social commentary drives "I'm Tide" -- meaning "tired" of a whole lot of aggravations of modern life; Walker is so exhausted that he can't even manage that second syllable -- and Murali Coryell's "Way Too Expensive," about economic inequity; there's also a richly earned dig at our most recent ex-president.

With electric guitar, slide and string, Walker fronts a band which hits hard and lands every punch. Walker is fluent in all the blues languages. Jeff Healey wore many musical hats during his brief life - band leader, singer, radio DJ, nightclub owner, trumpeter and clarinetist.

But the blind musician will be remembered best for playing searing guitar on his lap, looking like a pedal steel guitar man gone mad. Songs from the Road Stony Plain Records captures Healey's gift for energizing rock and blues tunes with powerful, sometimes blistering guitar work. Songs like his cover of the Beatles' Come Together and his own hit Angel Eyes start off sounding a little staid.

Then the songs build, with the payoff of strong guitar solos. Also deceptive are Healey's vocals, which occasionally sound a little tame. There's also great harmonica work from Dave Murphy and fine guitar interplay with Dan Noordemeer and Healey on the latter song.

The two extra musicians also chip in vocals, with Murphy being particularly strong on Come Together. Adding to Healey's original trio format definitely helps throughout the CD. Other highlights are a powerful version of the Allman Brothers' Whipping Post and some great 'wah-wah' guitar on their take of Cream's White Room. Drummer Al Webster and bassist Alec Fraser, who deserves credit for producing a fine array of songs.

They were from concerts in Norway, London, England and Toronto. Material somewhat resembles Healey's early career successes, which incuded millions in sales, two Grammy nominations and performing with stars like B.

King and George Harrison. Healey even appeared in the Patrick Swayze movie Roadhouse. Four of his band's tunes made the soundtrack, including a cover of the Doors' Roadhouse Blues. He later had a Toronto night spot named Jeff Healey's Roadhouse. He eventually changed direction, recording three albums with Jeff Healey's Jazz Wizards. Instead of guitar, Healey played trumpet and clarinet. Unfortunately, the cancer that blinded him retinoblastoma took Healey's life in March, Fans might find a little consolation in two albums released posthumously.

Besides Songs from the Road, Mess of Blues was released last year. Still revered in his native Canada, he remains at the top of his form even at age 75, and while his voice is weathered and his tales somewhat tattered, he continues to make music that is as indelible and gripping as ever. A series of sweeping, refl ective narratives, it details the people, places and indigenous wildlife of windswept Canadian prairies.

The riveting title track details the journey of a wolf pack transported to new environs in order to save them from extinction. If Springsteen and Mellencamp speak to the pulse of the American heartland, Tyson is their Canadian equivalent, equally intrepid, clear-eyed and compelling. The album rocked established notions in the country music world. His beautifully chiselled approach to songwriting caused multiple cases of whiplash in publishing houses where writers had been content in serving up too much gooey pop-saturated fare that had been drawn from the same stagnating pools for far too long.

Crowell, who was a contempaorary of Guy Clark and Townes Van Zandt, had the best of both worlds-artistic credibility and the kind of commercial success songwriters dream of. Major success as a performing artist was not going to elude him forever.

You put up an image, there's this self-conscious notoriety. In the '90s, he released three rather forgettable discs and his marriage to Cash crumbled. Crowell decided to pull back. I don't think I played five live shows in five years, from '95 to I built a new marriage, took long walks and my kids to school. Crowell has just released Sex and Gasoline. It's his fourth album of the new millennium and arguably his finest work,thanks in part to pieces like Truth Decay and The Rise and Fall of Intelligent Design.

Produced by Joe Henry, and released in Canada on Stony Plain Records, Crowell wanted fresh input into making records and felt the need to refocus on performing and singing. Much of the material is centred on his perceptions of the triumphs and struggles of being in today's world. My wife, women friends and daughters would nail me to the wall for attempting that," says Crowell, who examines beauty on Moving Work of Art , and Alzheimer's in Forty Winters.

He also managed to draw Phil Everly out of retirement for a day to sing on one of the album's songs, Truth Decay.

It was one of the highlights of my career, and my wife has made a 12 minute film out of that session. Robillard strips down Walker's sound, emphasizing his distinctive gospel-infused vocals while welcoming Walker's diverse influences.

Inexplicably overlooked as one of contemporary blues' most dynamic and innovative musicians, Walker has been knocking around the blues scene since his debut, releasing consistently exciting music that hasn't received the commercial acceptance it deserves. Hopefully that will change, as Witness to the Blues is one of Walker's finest efforts.

Eight of its 11 songs are Walker compositions, and even his versions of oft-covered chestnuts "Rollin' and Tumblin'" and "Sugar Mama" are given vigorous, creative arrangements that make them sound new. Walker and Copeland tear into the tune with a level of heat and enthusiasm that nearly equals the original.

No matter what he's singing, Walker's churchy approach is soulful, heartfelt, and spellbinding. He lets his voice crack naturally, and even if he's getting a little rough around the edges on the high notes, he seems particularly inspired on this set, perhaps because he finally has found a producer who brings out his best. Blues has an extraordinary musical emotion, with an inner texture dipped into a sixth sense that opens a weathered journey for whoever chooses its dramatic passage.

Every time I spin a fine grit of blues, life becomes focused. Block has set the flow for an Americana time capsule in musicianship! Block took this iconic existence to become her mission, unearthing the greatness of the man who influenced her world. Block is very much in control of her own precise formula.

The pick configurations are solid and methodical. Strategically injected solos truly ignite the fever blues can only trigger. Many times, blues is imparted through song with a hollow emotion. Classic feel with structure! Block appeals to the inner sense that the blues instills into an audience. A pure grit of life pours from her strings as she massages each fret of her musical drive. In this case, she applauds the life of Son House and with her smooth tones and hard core vocals.

Block came to the crossroads with this project and took it into the right direction. Big Dave McLean is one of a handful of musicians who long ago earned a high ranking in the heavyweight division of the Canadian blues scene,and he continues to challenge all comers. The guitar-and harp-wielding Winnipeg native is a force who instantly commands the audience's attention,yet the husky-voiced musician doesn't have a bombastic delivery.

Instead,with one hand firmly on the microphone and his eyes searching every corner of the room, McLean connects with combinations of rhythmic crunch, heartfelt turns of phrase and slaps of stinging steel. McLean has been praised for his encouragement of aspiring players and singers across the Prairies. He is essentially passing on what was presented to him plus years ago,when legendary bluesman Muddy Waters opened up his world to the young Winnipegger.

All those links in the blues chain bring us to this six-night stand at Blues on Whyte, 82nd Ave. It finds McLean teamed with Guitarmageddon, an aggregation of younger players who have all made their mark on the national scene. Between sets, McLean talked of first hearing a young Shaun Verreault in Saskatoon, when he wasn't of legal age to play the bars.

Verreault has been lifting audiences out of their seats as a member of Wide Mouth Mason, and as a solo peformer, for years. Rounding out the ensemble are the bass-playing Curtis Scarrow, who spearheaded this tour with McLean, and drummer Scotty Hills, who just came off a European tour with Mclean as part of a package with The Perpetrators. The foursome can come at a crowd as a full-blown, amps-turned-electric unit, ripping through versions of Got to Love Somebody, Rainin' in My Heart and Chicken Shack , which McLean humorouslyintroduces as Poulet de Chalet.

Then there's a tasty and slightly understated take of That's Alright , the Jimmy Rogers tune that was a staple in the original Muddy Waters band repertoire. In this setting, it finds Verreault slipping in effective Ron Wood-like rhythm licks between McLean's vocal lines. Mid-song tempo changes, gang vocals on choruses and interesting combinations of guitar styles, some fusing the sting of Texas influences with the tones of sruf guitar, also had the Blues on Whyte crowd applauding appreciatively after every tune in the opening set.

We have a huge repertoire to work with, " said McLean with a grin. While McLean thinks of this union as a little bit of a "payback" for his time spent as a mentor, the truth is that McLean, Verreault, Scarrow and Hills simply make for a superior blues revue.

For his latest release in a long association with Canada's Stony Plain label, guitarist and singer Duke Robillard digs deep into the American songbook of jazz classics and throws in a couple of original instrumentals for good measure. A Swingin' Session does much more than spotlight Robillard's nimble guitar work and nuanced vocals. Backed by his longtime bandmates and some former Roomful of Blues colleagues, Robillard directs the spotlight just as often on the horns and keyboards.

Like one of his heroes, Duke Ellington, Robillard plays his band like an instrument, and that comes naturally for these dozen players who share an affinity for the place where jazz meets blues. Many of these musicians hail from Robillard's Rhode Island stomping grounds, including such familiar names as Gordon Beadle tenor and baritone sax , Al Basile cornet , Scott Hamilton tenor sax , and Carl Querfurth trombone.

The songs come from familiar sources, but they're not necessarily well known to modern listeners, so the setlist sounds fresh. Blues and jazz scholars might pore over the obscure song selections and Robillard's approach to the arrangements, but none of that matters to the people who go to his shows. What makes this material work is what happens on the dance floor when a band swings this hard.

We should thank Robillard for reprising and reinventing classic American music in an age when real musicianship gets short shrift while shallow theatrics can earn you a stint on American Idol. Call me cranky, but I'd rather swing. His vocal delivery is as smooth as molasses, while his guitar - indeed, the entire instrumental backing - harkens back decades.

At most, Percy Mayfield might be credited for his song "Hit the Road jack," but this disc reveals a sonwriting ability that ran much deeper and broader than one hit.

Garrett's homage to Mayfield showcases not only the songs' humanity,but also Garrett's bluesy touch. His vocal delivery is as smooth as molasses,while his guitar-indeed,the entire instrumental backing-harkens back decades. Songs like "Stranger in My Own Hometown" are,perhaps,even darker than the title would suggest. Garretts' guitar playing does the same.

On "The Country" he plays against the organ,while drums keep a steady beat. This song too sounds like a recording from the '50s or '60s by a group of road house veterans at a slightly more uptown gig.

Then the mournful saxes return,making acuaintance with Garretts' heavy-on-th-reverb guitar on "To Claim It's Love", another down-on-his-luck story. Garretts' world-weary vocals are the perfect complement to the material,and the dolorous instrumental backing is spot on.

Jeff Healey's recent passing caused great sadness in the blues world and around the world. We were, perhaps, too used to having him around to appreciate his talents. I saw him first in Toronto in , when he was still unknown outside his home city. They brought him up on stage to play for a flabbergasted Albert Collins. It wasn't just his unique style, playing the guitar on his lap with a combination of pulling and plucking the strings, that surprised so many. It was also the fact that he was so good at it.

My last encounter with Jeff was as the emcee for his show at the Harvest Jazz and Blues Festival, leading his greatest love, his pre-Second World War era jazz band. He made it look so easy, and was so unassuming, you had to remind yourself of how good he was.

Recent years saw Healey move away from the blues for lengthy stretches of jazz, but he never stayed away for long. It remained his bread and butter, as concert requests continued to come in overseas and at home. Plus, he had his Toronto namesake bar, which thrived when its famous owner was onstage.

Healey put together a crack bar band for those gigs and figured he should document it on disc, as well. Part live, mostly studio, it's made up of tracks Healey's group would wow the crowds with, playing for the fun of it and showing off a little, too. Much of the disc is party-trick material, familiar songs that make a bar crowd happy, especially with the new and exciting takes the group brings to them.

The album is what it was meant to be, a great night at the best roadhouse around. But Healey is gone. And what stands out for me is that I won't see this group, which was scheduled to play the Harvest this September, do these songs. Hearing them now, hearing him, I realize what I always took for granted: He is that good.

Here are some of the most soaring live electric guitar solos you will ever need. They match the best players working today or in the past.

His signature style may have been how he played the guitar, but what he played was amazing, too. This last album will no doubt be my favourite blues album by Healey. Not bad, considering blues wasn't even his favourite music. It's easy to dismiss country music as antiquated or slow-witted, especially with the popularity of current Canadian indie stars like Feist or Tokyo Police Club, who wear their energy on their sleeves. Set next to bands like these, a sound like Corb Lund's may seem like a quaint throwback to a time when music was easy, vulgar and anything but complex.

Yet Lund's newest album is perhaps the most imaginative and daring Canadian indie album that will be released this year for exactly that reason. It's deceptive in its simplicity. On the surface, it's an album about that most reliable country music stereotype: But Lund has been reading his history textbooks, and the album is a lament for the old stories that Lund sorely wishes he had been a part of.

This is not so much a political album as it is a yearning for a kind of glory, one that is always just out of reach in times of war. This idea may turn some listeners off, but many will enjoy the way Lund appropriates the country genre to tell simple, effective stories with his throaty yelp. The music, if nothing else, is good. It doesn't need jangly power chords or crashing cymbals to get a rise out of the listener - it is stripped down and direct without overpowering his lyrics, which approach poetry.

The brusque rat-a-tat of military drums on the opening track "I Wanna Be In The Cavalry" belies the weight of its words. It would be easy to laugh at the folksy fiddle strings or steel guitar if they weren't put to such good use.

Lund has created a concept album in the very best sense of the term. Perhaps his greatest strength is that he doesn't condescend to the listener; he relies on our intelligence and open-mindedness. Yes, country music can be brashly, perhaps stupidly, political.

Sometimes, it can be about trucks and seedy bars and going home to yer darlin' after a hard day in the field. But Lund reminds us that country can have soul. It may be the last musical form that knows its roots, and can see what's been lost to the relentless hammering of modernity.

A front runner for this year's Top 10 list, Ronnie Earl has crafted one his best albums ever in Hope Radio. Concentrating on his strengths, this is pure instrumental blues, informed by Earl's passion for jazz and fuelled, emotionally, by a release from his troubled past. Live, the credit for the success of this record must be split with Dave Limina, whose prowess on piano and B3 organ is stupefying, allowing Earl those precious nanoseconds to execute every note with newfound passion, absolute confidence and razor-sharp precision.

Earl's tone rules the day across 11 seamless originals but exceptional inroads are made with Blues for the West Side , an minute opus that wrenches your gut with its soulful range and sheer majesty. Wolf Dance pays an upbeat tribute to Hubert Sumlin, while Kay My Dear - another deliciously languorous assault - demonstrates the subtle power of a taut rhythm section that always knows when to rise or fall between Earl's spirited takeoffs.

Blues for Otis Rush , likewise, serves up a minute slow burn of endless gratitude that commands your total attention. You'll not find a better way to spend 78 minutes. While the musical careers of the pair went their separate ways, they will be forever linked in the mind's and hearts of Canadian music fans. Ian Tyson has of course had an outstanding career helping to preserve and re-popularize the genre of true western music.

As a performer you tend to know your career has earned respect when other artists gather to do a tribute album, and one listen to this effort and you know Tyson's career is indeed worthy. This CD is crammed full of recognizable hits covered by some of the best in Canadian music, along with a few American friends added in. I truly enjoy the mix of veteran and new musical stars paying their respects here.

The CD starts with Canadian super group Blue Rodeo doing a sweet rendition of Four Strong Winds, an early hit from when Ian and Sylvia were famous just by their first names in this country.

On the very next cut Corb Lund, a more recent arrival to the country charts in Canada doing the western classic MC Horses. Cindy Church, yes another tie to Quartette, offers a rendition of Range Delivery.

The only thing really missing here is a rendition of Navajo Rug, maybe Tyson's best known, and best-loved songs. Perhaps for that reason no one felt comfortable covering such a signature song. Overall this is a great western CD, made even better because of the collection of artists coming together to pay homage to a true star of the Canadian music scene for decades. He has released 11 solo CDs, dating back to , and Four Strong Winds was a hit a decade earlier than that.

This is one to be cherished. His playing skills are legendary; so is his ability to tour practically non-stop. He has a label that has managed to promote him effectively worldwide and he has released over a dozen albums through them.

He has sessioned with the best of them, including Maria Muldaur, Dr. On his new double-disc release he is backed by an impressive collection of players, his regular lineup and special guests "Sugar" Ray Norica on harmonica and Al Basile on cornet among others.

A tour-de-force, World Full of Blues, solidifies that Duke Robillard is a man charged with creative talent causing him to birth unique blues. Robillard is a man in his prime hour. You will soon see another folk star. Spivey was correct in her prediction that the singer, who married Kweskin band member Geoff Muldaur, would become a shining light of the '60s folk revival.

Maria, of course, would also triumph in the pop, blues, jazz, and contemporary Christian music realms. One of the most eclectic song stylists of modern times, Muldaur returns to material associated with Spivey, Sippie Wallace, Mamie Smith, Bessie Smith, Alberta Hunter, Ma Rainey, and other blues divas of the s on her latest in a trilogy of CDs for the Canadian Stony Plain in which she explores the "classic blues" of that period.

One curiosity is a pop song titles Smile , credited in the booklet to Charlie Chaplin, Geoff Parsons, and John Turner, though in fact it is not their Smile. Pianist James Dapogny's Chicago Jazz Band does a superb job in backing Muldaur, its horn section supplying just the right moans when called for and the rhythm section providing some nicely syncopated New Orleans bounce.

Muldaur shines throughout, her raspy tone and wide vibrato an ideal match for the vintage material, and she brings appropriate sass to such risque tunes as Empty Bed Blues , Handy Man , and One Hour Mama.

Harry Manx and Kevin Breit are both singularly accomplished musicians. Both have an impressive history of travel and musical prowess. Both have individual style and their husky-voice-meets-sweet-and-rich vocal harmonies compliment each other so well, that we've given them our choice spot as our new album of the week. In Good We Trust is a rootsy, album with that down-home organic sound. It creates a comfortable atmosphere anywhere you might be. There's something for everyone including a vast array of instruments.

The songs are multidimensional and there is a Springsteen cover "I'm On Fire," which Springsteen himself liked so much that he signed Harry's unique cigar box guitar, which is featured on the album cover.

This is a gem of a find worth checking out. Ah talk about aging like fine wine. Valdy and Garry Fjellgaard have been part of the Canadian music scene for what seems like forever. The two have always shared a similar take on music,a style somewhere smack dab in between folk and country. So it was no surprise the duo might eventually get together for a CD and they did that a few years ago with the release of Contenders on the Stony Plain label.

The CD was a gem thanks to the seasoned, relaxed styles these two bring to their music. Fortunately for listeners Valdy and Fjellgaard are back at it, having hit the studios for Contenders Two and have once again put together a must-have CD. It states, "it must be these old troubadours don't know what else to do.

It would be a true shame if these two ever walked away from their music. They are consummate performers. And, having interviewed both in the past, I can tell you they are genuine, and true gentlemen in every sense of the word.

Order the book from indigo Chapters USA: Order the book from amazon. Blues and Roots Music Mavericks includes 25 in-depth conversations with a variety of roots music artists who have made significant impacts on popular music, ranging from B. The book is divided into four collections of interviews: Each interview is preceded by informative background material on the artist, Petersen's own stories of their meetings, and photographs. If you would like Holger to autograph your book, please detail who you would like it signed too, and any special message on our checkout page.

Ain't it funny, as Willie Nelson once mused in one of his bluesier tunes, how time slips away.

Lena loved her garden, especially her flowers, and enjoyed driving her car, crocheting and .. Three of his newly found first cousins later came to Canada for a visit and the connection blossomed into an instant lifelong friendship. their children, Tausha & Trey, Gladmar, SK; Trina (Larry) Webb, their daughter, Samantha. Kenaston Obituaries - Kenaston, Saskatchewan. and nephews and their extended families with whom she maintained a loyal and close connection. never wanting to settle in one place and always looking for his next adventure. . She loved the "sewing circle " comprised of the ladies of North Park and always made. May 1, Saskatchewan, [email protected]is-1900.com .. Left to right: Sherrie Webb, Associate Editor; Karen Richardson, Publications Manager;. Dr Terri.