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This Board presided over the judging process that resulted in the winners. Joseph Pulitzer, Jr, chair; John Hohenberg, administrator. But journalists are people who will go where they are pointed, and Mr. Bradlee generally pointed to important, consequential subjects. People who worked for him went through walls to bring back those stories, some of which revealed the true course of American history and some of which altered it.

The newspaper business can be a grand endeavor, but most of the people who commit journalism would never be mistaken for larger than life. Journalists are bystanders who chronicle the exploits of people who actually do things. But Ben Bradlee did things. He went to war, loved early and often, befriended and took on presidents, swore like a sailor, and partied like a movie star.

Now that he is gone — he died on Tuesday at the age of 93 at his home in Georgetown — it is tough to imagine a newspaperman ever playing the kind of outsize role that he once did in Washington.

He took over an also-ran paper and turned it into a formidable fighting ship like the one on which he served in World War II. Once the newspaper he oversaw gained steam, there was only the relentless effort to beat the competition, to find and woo talent, to pursue targets that The Post deemed worthy. In the more than quarter-century that he helped lead the newsroom, from to , he doubled its staff and circulation, and multiplied its ambitions.

He would have been a terrible newspaperman in the current context — buyouts, reduced print schedules, timidity about offending advertisers — but he was a perfect one for his time.

Bradlee had the attention span of a gnat — anecdotes of him walking away from a conversation he ceased to find interesting were common — but he was completely hypnotized by the chase of a good story. His own life and persona make for a pretty fair tale: He was Zelig-like in his ability to appear at critical junctures in American history. But even though I barely knew him, he was hilarious to bump into.

Anybody who has ever watched Mr. There was the smile, a flash of white teeth matching the white collar of the custom striped shirts he wore without fail, and a voice that was a mix of gravel and gravitas that had a hearty and generally profane word for everybody. Bradlee tilted a room just by being himself.

He was a durable celebrity in Washington and beyond, partly because he was the rare person who became more handsome as he grew older. Few journalists could suggest that they were better looking than the movie stars who played them, as Jason Robards portrayed Mr. Bradlee could have claimed as much. He was more Clark Gable than Clark Kent.

By some estimations, including his own, his most enduring accomplishment had nothing to do with the Pentagon Papers or Watergate. After he became editor of The Post, he watched with envy as The New York Herald Tribune and magazines like Esquire and Playboy were using a different vocabulary, a so-called New Journalism, to expand the ways in which stories were told. The effect on the business was profound, as if Chuck Berry had walked into a Glenn Miller show and started playing guitar.

He expanded the vernacular of newspapering, enabling real, actual writers to shed the shackles of convention and generate daily discourse that made people laugh, spill their coffee or throw The Post down in disgust.

But although he grew up in Boston, not even knowing anyone who was black, he managed to make a credible newspaper in a majority-black city. Bradlee could be almost cartoonishly ambitious. He probably would have gotten along fine on the remaining testosterone. Ben Bradlee clanked when he walked. The executive editor of The Post from to , Bradlee oversaw the Post's prize-winning coverage of the Watergate affair. He came to journalism via Harvard, did a stint working for the State Department in Paris, before becoming a reporter and editor at Newsweek and The Post.

In , he defied the Nixon administration by publishing the Pentagon Papers, a top-secret study of the Vietnam War and endured harsh criticism from Republicans during the early days of the Watergate scandal. Vindicated by Nixon's resignation, Bradlee was lionized in the movie version of "All the President's Men," where he was portrayed by Jason Robards.

In retirement he published a memoir, "A Good Life. Wallace Carroll , a retired newspaper editor and publisher who campaigned against the Vietnam War and led his paper to a Pulitzer Prize for environmental reporting, died on Sunday in a nursing home in Winston-Salem, N. Carroll had first joined The Winston-Salem Journal and Sentinel in as executive editor but left in to serve eight years as news editor of the Washington bureau of The New York Times.

He returned to Winston-Salem as editor and publisher from to Under his direction, the paper favored gun control and busing to integrate public schools, positions unpopular with many North Carolinians. Articles about environmental protection -- particularly a series on strip mining -- earned the paper the Pulitzer Prize for public service.

Dean Acheson, the former secretary of state and an adviser to President Lyndon B. Johnson, showed the editorial to Johnson and stood by while the president read it. Later that month, Johnson announced that he would not run for re-election and would begin peace negotiations with North Vietnam. Carroll's editorial had influenced his thinking. Two years later, Mr. Carroll wrote in another article: It is the soul of America that is being lost in Vietnam.

It is time for us to save the soul of America. Wallace Carroll was born in Milwaukee on Dec. He began his journalism career as a reporter with The United Press in Chicago, and the news agency sent him to Europe to cover the Nazi advances. After the United States entered the war, Mr. Reston wrote in his memoirs, ''Deadline,'' that Mr. Carroll emphasized ''with his usual common sense'' the importance of explaining United States policy to Americans and people in the allied countries but was often rebuffed by his superiors.

After the war, he wrote a book about his work, ''Persuade or Perish,'' and became executive editor in Winston-Salem. Carroll maintained his friendship with Mr. Reston, and in , Mr. Reston, as Washington bureau chief of The Times , hired Mr. Carroll to be his deputy with the title of news editor. Carroll was in charge of day-to-day coverage. Carroll bureau chief if he would stay at The Times. Carroll declined the offer and in , he returned to Winston-Salem to be editor and publisher.

Carroll's wife, Margaret, died last year. He is survived by a son, John S. After he retired in , Mr. Carroll lectured for several years at Wake Forest University. Carroll spent most of his career as a news executive, Reston wrote that he had ''a studied respect for the English language'' and ''could have edited Lincoln's Gettysburg Address and improved it. Scion of a family that owned The Des Moines Register , started Look magazine and came to dominate the newspaper business in Minneapolis for more than half a century, Mr.

Cowles rhymes with bowls succeeded his father in as the editor of two Minneapolis papers, the morning Tribune and the evening Star. His tenure was rocky, but during it the papers won praise for aggressive local reporting, increased arts and science coverage and support for the civil rights movement and the Equal Rights Amendment in editorials.

Though he was generally described as a progressive liberal, Mr. Cowles served on a White House committee in to generate support for President Johnson's war policies.

In , the company merged The Star and The Tribune and cut its work force, prompting the editor of the merged papers to quit in protest.

Cowles subsequently fired the publisher and assumed the role himself. But just a few months later, in early , the board of Cowles Media, which included his sister and two cousins, dismissed him as publisher and head of the company as well. He remained on the board until and into the s continued to control a substantial percentage of company stock through his management of a family trust.

Cowles Media was sold to the McClatchy Company in Beyond his turbulent stewardship of the newspapers, Mr. Cowles was known in Minneapolis and St. Paul for his philanthropy and his belief that arts institutions and sports teams were necessary for cities to grow and thrive.

In , he served on a steering committee -- and by most accounts was its leading voice -- that persuaded the British director Tyrone Guthrie to establish a resident theater company in Minneapolis to perform classic works in repertory.

Four decades later, he was co-chairman of the architecture committee for the new Guthrie Theater that opened in In the late s and early s, Mr. Cowles was active in the construction of the Metrodome, a state-financed domed stadium in downtown Minneapolis for the city's two major sports franchises, the Minnesota Twins and the Minnesota Vikings. His position on the project was controversial.

Opponents, including staff members at The Minneapolis Tribune , thought it was a clear conflict of interest for the owner of a newspaper to take a public position on an important local issue it was covering. In , staff members placed an ad in their own paper disassociating themselves from the company's involvement. Humphrey Metrodome opened in ; the Twins have since moved to Target Field. Cowles said in a interview that the impetus for his support of the Guthrie and the Metrodome were the same.

His father, John, and his uncle Gardner Cowles Jr. Young John graduated from the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and Harvard, and spent two years in the Army before joining the family business as a reporter.

After his dismissal from the company in , Mr. Cowles began a somewhat eclectic career. He studied agricultural economics, taught aerobics, toured in the United States and Europe with a modern dance company, and helped establish a women's professional fast-pitch softball league. He also continued his arts philanthropy around the Twin Cities; most recently, the Cowles Center, a theater devoted to dance, opened in Minneapolis last fall.

Cowles is survived by his wife, the former Jane Sage Fuller, who is known as Sage Fuller Cowles and whom he married in ; another son, Charles; a daughter, Jane Sage Cowles; a stepdaughter, Tessa Flores; a sister, Sarah Cowles Doering; a brother, Russell; 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. In , he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for a series on life in post-independence India that included the final newspaper interview with Mahatma Gandhi.

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